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A 22 year old Henry Cavill screen testing as Ian Fleming's James Bond 007 for Casino Royale in 2005. He was Craig's runner up (as well as Director Martin Campbell's favored choice) and would have been 23 in the film had he been cast!

A 22 year old Henry Cavill screen testing as Ian Fleming's James Bond 007 for Casino Royale in 2005. He was Craig's runner up (as well as Director Martin Campbell's favored choice) and would have been 23 in the film had he been cast! submitted by galactusisathiccboi to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Dalton's Biggest Problem Wasn't Following up To Roger Moore and an Audience Unprepared for a darker Bond or The Cultural Climate (such as the AIDs Scare) Or even that he wasn't an Escapist Bond.............. But the fact his films are pretty weak entries

I will state flatout Dalton is my favorite Bond. Not only because I already have a bias before getting into 007 thanks to his superb acting in older films like Cromwell and Lion In the Winter (man his role as Philip puts the Beejeezles in me)...... But for the same reason everyone here states that he's the most faithful interpretation of Fleming's original protagonist so far on film.
In fact if you watched his 60s and 70s stuff you will understand why Dalton was an strong choice to follow up on Connery and they even tried to approach him a second time before Moore was selected after Lazenby called quits. I will save that for another topic but I really recommend people watch his performance in Wuthering Heights, Cromwell, and Lion In the Winter (3 of his earliest roles) to see just how PERFECT he was as an obvious choice as replacing Sean Connery as James Bond.
The answer is much simpler. TLD and LTK were weak franchise entries. They're by no means terrible but at best they are average films and I honestly would rate them as mediocre.
Even with how dark his Bond became, this is the real problem. If TLD had the same quality say GoldenEye, From Russia With Love, and most specific Casino Royale (esp since that film successfully convinced the public the change in Bond formula so easily because of its excellence), I think audiences would have accepted Dalton more smoothly and thus more at least a trilogy in his era rather than the incomplete duology we got.
In fact watching the films was pretty hard because of just how often subpar everything else is from cinematography to fight choreography and often underwhelming cast choices (esp the chosen Bond girls) and most of all boring slow mediocre writing.
The only real reason we ultimately find a way to enjoy his films is because Dalton is really a top tier actor. Dalton himself is the saving graces of these otherwise mediocre films.
Basically you can get Brosnan or Connery to act in TLD and it'd still come of as very weak because the whole film was mediocre. LTK without the 007 licensing and Dalton's outstanding acting would have come off as a generic action movie.
So basically Dalton suffered the same problems Brosnan did except he lacked a GoldenEye quality movie to kick off his tenure as Bond.
Anyone agree or not? I mean Craig started in the same similar rough place Dalton did and even had more attacks from the start for even other reasons that %%%$ed off long time fans such as being blonde instead of the traditional dark haired Bond and not seeming like the ideal first choice for the Bond archetype (as many others including George Clooney and my man Julian McMahon from Charmed, a show I'm also a fan of, were considered)......... But Casino Royale was so damn excellent in everyway (including Craig's acting in the film even if it wasn't what hardcore fans consider James Bondesque) that it gave Craig the sparkle needed to be accepted as the newest Bond esp by the mainstream.
submitted by EvaWolves to 007 [link] [comments]

Underrated Bond films

Over the years, I have discussed what Bond fans consider the best and worst 007 films ever made. First of all, there is almost universal agreement on the early Connery films, Live and Let Die, The Spy Who Loved Me, The Living Daylights, Goldeneye, Casino Royale and Skyfall being great and rightly so. On Her Majesty's Secret Service rightly has been considered great nowadays by most too.
After that, things get weird. Licence to Kill is considered great by many but as an action film akin to Lethal Weapon or Die Hard more than as a Bond film. Fair enough but what happens next is amazing. Casino Royale 1967 is not only the worst Bond film ever made but also one of the worst films ever made. Yet, some Bond fans put it above Quantum of Solace, Diamonds are Forever, Octopussy, Tomorrow Never Dies and Moonraker, all to me great Bond films. A View To a Kill then splits people who love Zorin in it but think Roger Moore is 'too old'. Yet many also rank the odious 1967 Casino Royale above it.
I do not see the hatred for some Bond films. All films I mention here (bar Casino Royale 1967) I love. I know other Bond films have their flaws (the finale and car chase in The Man With The Golden Gun are way below par, the climax in SPECTRE was well a bit of an anti-climax, etc.) but they are still great films with great moments.
Casino Royale 1967 on the other hand has nothing to offer only a weird 'pop culture of the time' feel. It works neither as a Bond film or a Bond film spoof. It has a great cast but utterly wastes it. Orson Welles could have been the greatest Bond villain ever if this was made properly.
I have watched CR1967 4 times to try and understand/like it but it is what it is. Another problem with it is it is not set on location much. It seems they only went on location in Scotland for the castle scenes. The rest is in a studio and full of dated and weird over the top 1960s cliches. This is the only Bond film I hate.
submitted by Subrabear to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Dalton's Biggest Problem Wasn't Following up To Roger Moore and an Audience Unprepared for a darker Bond or The Cultural Climate (such as the AIDs Scare) Or even that he wasn't an Escapist Bond.............. But the fact his films are pretty weak entries

I will state flatout Dalton is my favorite Bond. Not only because I already have a bias before getting into 007 thanks to his superb acting in older films like Cromwell and Lion In the Winter (man his role as Philip puts the Beejeezles in me)...... But for the same reason everyone here states that he's the most faithful interpretation of Fleming's original protagonist so far on film.
In fact if you watched his 60s and 70s stuff you will understand why Dalton was an strong choice to follow up on Connery and they even tried to approach him a second time before Moore was selected after Lazenby called quits. I will save that for another topic but I really recommend people watch his performance in Wuthering Heights, Cromwell, and Lion In the Winter (3 of his earliest roles) to see just how PERFECT he was as an obvious choice as replacing Sean Connery as James Bond.
The answer is much simpler. TLD and LTK were weak franchise entries. They're by no means terrible but at best they are average films and I honestly would rate them as mediocre.
Even with how dark his Bond became, this is the real problem. If TLD had the same quality say GoldenEye, From Russia With Love, and most specific Casino Royale (esp since that film successfully convinced the public the change in Bond formula so easily because of its excellence), I think audiences would have accepted Dalton more smoothly and thus more at least a trilogy in his era rather than the incomplete duology we got.
In fact watching the films was pretty hard because of just how often subpar everything else is from cinematography to fight choreography and often underwhelming cast choices (esp the chosen Bond girls) and most of all boring slow mediocre writing.
The only real reason we ultimately find a way to enjoy his films is because Dalton is really a top tier actor. Dalton himself is the saving graces of these otherwise mediocre films.
Basically you can get Brosnan or Connery to act in TLD and it'd still come of as very weak because the whole film was mediocre. LTK without the 007 licensing and Dalton's outstanding acting would have come off as a generic action movie.
So basically Dalton suffered the same problems Brosnan did except he lacked a GoldenEye quality movie to kick off his tenure as Bond.
Anyone agree or not? I mean Craig started in the same similar rough place Dalton did and even had more attacks from the start for even other reasons that %%%$ed off long time fans such as being blonde instead of the traditional dark haired Bond and not seeming like the ideal first choice for the Bond archetype (as many others including George Clooney and my man Julian McMahon from Charmed, a show I'm also a fan of, were considered)......... But Casino Royale was so damn excellent in everyway (including Craig's acting in the film even if it wasn't what hardcore fans consider James Bondesque) that it gave Craig the sparkle needed to be accepted as the newest Bond esp by the mainstream.
submitted by EvaWolves to bond [link] [comments]

Did Casino Royale HAVE to be a reboot?

Okay, so first off, Casino Royale is one of my absolute favorite Bond films and the first one I saw in theatres. And I love the way it worked as an origin story for Bond. So this post is not to critique the direction that EON went in, but rather just a fun thought experiment.
My point is, if EON wanted to adapt Casino Royale, then did they feel that it had to be a reboot?
Okay, I guess if it was to be Bond's origin story, then it had to be a reboot set in the 21st century. Making a prequel would be confusing as hell given that Bond is ageless. Would it be a prequel to Connery's Bond, set in the 1950's? Or a prequel to Brosnan's Bond, set in the 1980's? And so on.
But I guess that brings us to the next level of the question - why did Casino Royale have to be an origin story?
The original novel really isn't an origin story for Bond. It starts off with Bond already well established as 007 and embarking on just another mission. Reference in a couple of later novels do suggest that Casino Royale may have been one of Bond's earliest missions as a 00, but it was by no means meant to be his first.
So why the need to specifically adapt Casino Royale as an 'origin story'? It could have been just another Bond adventure. And if they wanted a younger Bond actor, they could simply have cast a younger actor without bothering about continuity - they'd done it before with Dalton following Moore.
The only reason I can think of is that after Batman Begins, the 'reboot'/'origin story' bug hit them and they decided to do the same to refresh the Bond franchise - and the very first Bond story was the ideal way to do that. Also, maybe officially wiping out past films would allow them to distance this new darker and more human take on Bond from the likes of Brosnan surfing a CGI wave!
I dunno...anyone know something concrete about why they took this step?
submitted by sanddragon939 to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Pitching a 007 reboot

Pitching a 007 reboot
Hello! So, as many of you already know, No Time to Die will be Daniel Craig's last movie as James Bond. The actor has been around since 2006's Casino Royale (for over fourteen years), so it was about time that the "Craig era" ended. After Craig leaves, the franchise can go two routes: following the Craig movies with a new actor or rebooting the series with a new version of the character.
I very much prefer the second route, since I feel Craig's Bond should be wrapped up by the end of No Time to Die, letting a new version of 007 get in the ground. So, with my very little knowledge of how Reddit works (I'm very new to this), I've decided to make a raw pitch of how I would like to see a new version of James Bond. I hope this doesn't end up being a TL;DR post, but here we go!

Cast
To begin this pitch, I've decided to introduce you to my own cast for the 007 universe. I don't have a clear idea on specific characters or secondary actors, but I am very decided on who I want to play the part of the main characters.

· JAMES BOND - Richard Madden
https://preview.redd.it/4nfwppeutvw51.jpg?width=1275&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9f2e957f27bbc6163d878b53fa3d9440009c4647
This is the one I'm most confident of. Since I watched him on Game of Thrones and after following his career and public appearances, I could see no other as James Bond.
Richard Madden is young (34 years old at the moment) and could play Bond for many years to come. He also has the style, charm, looks and feel of the world's best agent, so he could play a very fleshed out, stylish version of the character that also feels human and vulnerable. His role in HBO's epic fantasy has proven him to be a worthy actor, and one who could take the mantle of one of Hollywood's most iconic roles with enough value. So, yes, as much as I'd also like other actors, Richard Madden IS James Bond.

· M - Idris Elba
https://preview.redd.it/8onh7v7puvw51.jpg?width=720&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a58c637ee5a82e387212be54dfbcac390401f33a
Yes, yes. I know Idris Elba is many people's favourite choice for James Bond. But to me, Elba, who is now 48 years old, would be a much better fit for 007's instructor and guide, M.
The role, which was previously depicted by the iconic portrayal of Judi Dench and has lately been taken by the magnificent Ralph Fiennes, requires someone who equals confidence, strength and style. Both Dench and Fiennes have perfectly matched these characteristics, and I'm very confident that Elba does too. We've previously seen him in some sort of "mentor" slash "boss" role in Pacific Rim, so imagining him as M is pretty easy.

· Q - Phoebe Waller-Bridge
https://preview.redd.it/eu6yt3tdvvw51.jpg?width=940&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a240a98d865e4d321a4ea949443765c482d5e147
Q was a tough choice for me for a long time. First I wanted Benedict Cumberbatch, but it felt too obvious and he's already very busy with his Doctor Strange role. Then I thought of Jane Levy, but she lacks the qualities that I was looking for in a character like Q. But this year I saw Fleabag and, when thinking of fancasting Q, it was clear as water: Phoebe Waller-Bridge.
I always think of Q as this smart-ass, witty, kind of socially weird character that is all brain but has no real skill for people. Waller-Bridge is an absolute hurricane of wit, is clever as hell and has this weird feeling to her that makes her both strange and attracting. Put a pair of glasses on her and there you go, the perfect Q.
For this version, I'd have Q be not only the one that creates Bond's gadgets, but also a more "guy-in-the-chair" type of character. So... yes, Phoebe is my favourite choice for obvious reasons.

· Ben Mendelsohn - Dr. Julius No
https://preview.redd.it/wk61kgthwvw51.jpg?width=1365&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=127b79d234af8c3ac81b157e0dcffc7b0f4557a5
So, while this reboot wouldn't be adapting Ian Fleming's Dr. No, I would very much like the movie to take back Bond's first cinematic villain in a new story. I know Ben Mendelsohn is always depicted as the "bad guy" in a story, but damn, he does it good.
Mendelsohn has a very sinister feeling to him, but could also twist Dr. No's character to be a much more interesting villain in this reboot. So, while I'm not extremely confident on this choice (I thought of Tom Hiddleston first), this is for now my choice for the reboot's main villain.

· JAWS - John Cena
https://preview.redd.it/nxamxye5xvw51.jpg?width=2738&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=2e5e4fd9872e4cf80e0896f3dd128563cc3bdd4d
Besides the main villain, I want a secondary baddie who plays a more physical role that can put Bond at risk in a fight. It felt pretty obvious right from the get-go that I'd take back one of 007's most legendary bad guys, Jaws, and I instantly thought of John Cena.
While he's too much of a good guy, I believe Cena would be the perfect fit for a brute villain who's all muscles and not much brains, and who can have Dr. No's back as his number one man.

Director
The thought of who could be the new Bond director has been running through my mind for a looong time now. For a brief moment I thought of Christopher Nolan, but I feel like his approach would be very similar to Craig's movies, with a very grounded and realistic tone. And for this new 007 I want a more sci-fi oriented spy movie, just like his more classic adventures. Gadgets, impossible stunts and a kinda techy tone to it.
So, for this movie, my pick is definitely Guy Ritchie. The guy can play with crazy elements, can do action scenes and balance drama and comedy like few others. I absolutely love his job in the Sherlock Holmes movies, and his Man from UNCLE movie proved he could NAIL a spy thriller movie.
For the record, Matthew Vaughn would be my second choice. He's a fantastic director and has already touched the spy genre (you know what I'm talking about), so he'd be a good fit as well.

Music
So intense
One of the most important elements of a 007 movie is the music. Not only the iconic "movie songs" that have welcomed artists such as Tina Turner, Adele or, most recently, Billie Eilish, but also the soundtrack as well.
For the movie song, my definitive pick would be Arctic Monkeys. The band from Sheffield has proven they can neil the Bond tone with songs like Fir and the Thud, or their more recent album Tranquility Base + Casino, and they've already stated their interest on making a Bond theme. So there is no doubt: the authors of the smash hit Do I Wanna Know? should make the song for a James Bond reboot.
As for the soundtrack itself, Michael Giacchino is the only one I can think of. He's had a pretty amazing career, composing the scores for movies such as Rogue One, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Doctor Strange, Star Trek and the upcoming The Batman movie, and has proven to be an incredibly versatile composer that can flesh out the tone of a movie with just a few notes. I'd absolutely love to hear a 007 soundtrack composed by him.

Story pitch and conclusion
I'm not very clear on what I'd do with the story of the movie, but I know I would like to have an unexperienced James Bond, maybe even telling some sort of origin story to him, and have him meet his allies for the first time. Of course, Dr. No would play a threat on a global scale, that would have Bond in the middle of a great test to prove his value as who would later be known as the world's greatest spy.
With a cast like the one I've crafted, Guy Ritchie's vision and Giacchino/Arctic Monkeys on the music, I believe the movie would be interesting to say the least. Let me know what you think!
submitted by oscarredfield to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Dalton's Biggest Problem Wasn't Following up To Roger Moore and an Audience Unprepared for a darker Bond or The Cultural Climate (such as the AIDs Scare) Or even that he wasn't an Escapist Bond.............. But the fact his films are pretty weak entries

I will state flatout Dalton is my favorite Bond. Not only because I already have a bias before getting into 007 thanks to his superb acting in older films like Cromwell and Lion In the Winter (man his role as Philip puts the Beejeezles in me)...... But for the same reason everyone here states that he's the most faithful interpretation of Fleming's original protagonist so far on film.
In fact if you watched his 60s and 70s stuff you will understand why Dalton was an strong choice to follow up on Connery and they even tried to approach him a second time before Moore was selected after Lazenby called quits. I will save that for another topic but I really recommend people watch his performance in Wuthering Heights, Cromwell, and Lion In the Winter (3 of his earliest roles) to see just how PERFECT he was as an obvious choice as replacing Sean Connery as James Bond.
The answer is much simpler. TLD and LTK were weak franchise entries. They're by no means terrible but at best they are average films and I honestly would rate them as mediocre.
Even with how dark his Bond became, this is the real problem. If TLD had the same quality say GoldenEye, From Russia With Love, and most specific Casino Royale (esp since that film successfully convinced the public the change in Bond formula so easily because of its excellence), I think audiences would have accepted Dalton more smoothly and thus more at least a trilogy in his era rather than the incomplete duology we got.
In fact watching the films was pretty hard because of just how often subpar everything else is from cinematography to fight choreography and often underwhelming cast choices (esp the chosen Bond girls) and most of all boring slow mediocre writing.
The only real reason we ultimately find a way to enjoy his films is because Dalton is really a top tier actor. Dalton himself is the saving graces of these otherwise mediocre films.
Basically you can get Brosnan or Connery to act in TLD and it'd still come of as very weak because the whole film was mediocre. LTK without the 007 licensing and Dalton's outstanding acting would have come off as a generic action movie.
So basically Dalton suffered the same problems Brosnan did except he lacked a GoldenEye quality movie to kick off his tenure as Bond.
Anyone agree or not? I mean Craig started in the same similar rough place Dalton did and even had more attacks from the start for even other reasons that %%%$ed off long time fans such as being blonde instead of the traditional dark haired Bond and not seeming like the ideal first choice for the Bond archetype (as many others including George Clooney and my man Julian McMahon from Charmed, a show I'm also a fan of, were considered)......... But Casino Royale was so damn excellent in everyway (including Craig's acting in the film even if it wasn't what hardcore fans consider James Bondesque) that it gave Craig the sparkle needed to be accepted as the newest Bond esp by the mainstream.
submitted by EvaWolves to JamesBond [link] [comments]

THEORY: James Bond (Daniel Craig) Is Dead

so i rewatched the Craig films this week and came up with a theory that reconciles all of the sins of SPECTRE in my head-canon.
here we go.
MULTI-BOND THEORY
before i begin i wanted to preface the Multiple Bond Theory. this posits that all Bond films are mostly interconnected, as "James Bond 007" is a code name passed down agent to agent over the years. if this were true, Sean Connery's Bond would have lived in the same universe as Daniel Craig's Bond. i'm not sure if the previous Bond films ever directly contradicted this theory, but i liked going with it in my head-canon.
PROBLEMS WITH SPECTRE
from Casino Royale to Skyfall, the Daniel Craig movies were a neat little trilogy. CR served as “Bond Begins”, opening with his first mission. Quantum was a direct continuation of CR, picking up moments after the last movie ended. Skyfall finally presented him with a formidable arch-nemesis. then at the end of it all, we finally see the classic Bond set up - he meets M in his office where Moneypenny sits at the secretary desk, the music swells, and we close with the classic gun barrel sequence.
the best thing about all of this was that it had no strings attached to the prior Bond movies. it could serve as a prequel for any generic Bond story (accepting that Judi Dench was fan-service casting, carrying on the tradition of Q). OR it could serve as a sequel under the Multi-Bond Theory, leaving Daniel Craig as the successor to Pierce Brosnan, and Judi Dench as the same M all along - which worked for me.
then they had to do SPECTRE and unravel it all. since SPECTRE introduced elements we've seen before, it definitively kills the Multi-Bond Theory. then there's general gripes other have mentioned: it overdid the old Bond tropes, something that the previous Craig movies used sparingly. the concept of Blofeld as Bond's brother was a step too far. the concept that all of the previous villains were connected seemed unnecessary. and Swann over Vesper? really? well, i guess.
KINCADE
going back to Skyfall, i learned of a rumor that the elderly Scottish man at Skyfall Manor (Kincade) was originally conceived to be played by Sean Connery. if they had done this, it would have stirred the Multi-Bond Theory in such a fun way. it could explain why Craig's Bond privately owns Connery's DB40 from Goldfinger. and in this universe, there would have been a scenario where a retired Sean Connery would have met and shared stories with a childhood Daniel Craig.
WHEN CRAIG DIED
so during the final battle at Skyfall, Bond falls into a frozen lake. we see him fight a guy underwater, and then light a flare to try and find an escape. however, no opening is visible and we never actually see him come out of the lake. instead, he just shows up at the last minute to save M, and then we cut to London with all of the set up stuff i talked about to close out the trilogy.
so my head-canon is that Daniel Craig died in that lake, and Silva won by killing M and himself in the church. that's where Skyfall really ended. everything we saw from the lake onwards are just a dying man's oxygen-deprived brain trying to reconcile what's happening to him. he's incorporating his past missions, his family history, and Connery's old Bond stories all into one "life flashing before your eyes" moment. that's why SPECTRE, unlike any Bond movie before, starts with the title card "THE DEAD ARE ALIVE". this is a dead man's fantasy.
submitted by lkodl to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Film Rankings with Explanations, Ratings, and Tiers

During quarantine, I've had the opportunity to rewatch every movie in relatively short succession. I've seen them all 2-10 times and have been a lifelong Bond fan. I enjoy every Bond film, even the "bad" ones, but I wanted to try and rank them. I used a scoring system to help me, but ultimately went with my gut (e.g. License to Kill MUST be better than The World is Not Enough). I thought a tier system of ranking was useful, because it really is splitting hairs to rank some of these. Feel free to critique my ratings, my ratings weightings, and opinions!

You could say I have too much time on my hands
Tier 7: The Worst
  1. Die Another Day: Best Sword Fight
- Why it's not irredeemable: For being the lowest ranked film on this list, it's not without its moments. Bond getting caught, tortured, then escaping from MI6 was interesting and novel. The ice hotel was neat, as well as the chase scene. I'll even defend the much maligned invisible car, as the Aston Martin Vanquish is quite a car.
- Why it's not higher: Personally, I think Halle Berry is a terrible Bond girl, alternating between damsel in distress and super woman as the plot demands it. Moreover, Graves and the plot in general is pretty cheesy and boring. Perhaps most damaging is the deadly serious tone of the movie, which doesn't even provide the fun and excitement Brosnan's films generally provide the viewer.
- Most under-appreciated part: The fencing scene is the best action scene of the entire movie. It's surprising it took Bond this long to fence, but seeing them go at it across the club was a blast.

Tier 6: Disappointing
  1. Quantum of Solace: Best Car Chase
- Why it's this high: The action is quite good, likely meriting the distinction of the best car chase in the entire series (the pre-credits sequence). Mathis is a good ally and it is sad to see him go.
- Why it's not higher: My biggest beef with Craig's Bond films is that they are too serious, so when the plot and script isn't top-notch, the movie watching experience is just kind of dull. Quantum of Solace takes a bold risk in making the first Bond sequel, but unfortunately it's just not that good. Greene seems like a rather pathetic Bond villain, and his henchman (the worst in the series?) ends up in a neck-brace after getting tripped by Camilla. Also, the shaky cam is distracting and exhausting.
- Most under-appreciated part: I actually thing the theme song is pretty good! Maybe I'm just too much of a Jack White groupie, but I think it rocks.

  1. Moonraker: Best Locales
- Why it's this high: I'm pleased to see Jaws making a return, as he is an amazing henchman. On that note, the pre-credits sequence with Bond and Jaws falling out of the plane is exhilarating. Holly Goodhead is a very good Bond girl, beautiful, smart, and competent. Roger Moore always does an excellent job playing the role with suavity and wit.
- Why it's not higher: Gosh it's cheesy. Particularly egregious is Jaws' love story. The theme song is terrible and Bond doesn't have any solid allies besides Goodhead and Jaws.
- Most under-appreciated part: They really go all out with the settings here. Obviously, space is pretty polarizing, but I think Bond clearly should go to space at SOME point during the series. In addition, Italy and Brazil were gorgeous views, while Drax's estate is magnificent.

  1. Spectre: Best Shooting
- Why it's this high: Rewatching this for the second time, I realized Lea Seydoux does a good job as the Bond girl, and it's actually quite believable she and James could work out, as she is the daughter of an assassin and can understand him (as Blofeld points out). Seeing Bond show off his marksmanship was quite satisfying, especially that one long shot during the escape from Blofeld's compound. Bonus points for Bond's DB10 and resurrecting the DB5.
- Why it's not higher: The fatal flaw of this film is making Blofeld Bond's adopted brother. How did Bond not recognize him? How is Blofeld able to keep himself secret from British intelligence yet every criminal worth his salt knows of him? The worst part is that it actually cheapens the plot of the other Craig movies. I believe the Bond franchise should stay clear from sequels from here on out. Yes, they can weave a great story if done correctly, but it's so much more difficult to make great sequels (e.g. Star Wars only made two worthy sequels in seven tries) than to do one-offs. As usual for a Craig film, Bond has little charisma (save for his surprisingly good rapport with Moneypenny) and little in the way of jokes to lighten the mood.
- Most under-appreciated part: The train fight scene with Dave Bautista is great! Gosh it was awesome to see them go at it, break through walls, and a priceless expression on Bautista's face when he knows he's done. Bautista is the first decent henchman since the 90s, so glad to see the series go back to this staple.

  1. The Man with the Golden Gun: Best Potential, Worst Execution
- Why it's this high: This Bond movie frustrates more than any other, as it has the potential to be an all-time great. Bond's debriefing starts off with promise, as it turns out the world's top assassin is gunning for Bond! For the first time in the series, Bond seems vulnerable! M makes a hilarious quip as to who would try to kill Bond ("jealous husbands ... the list is endless"). Furthermore, the legendary Christopher Lee is possible the best Bond villain, a rare peer of 007.
- Why it's not higher: Unfortunately, the movie opts to change course so that it's just Maud Adams trying to get Bond to kill Scaramanga. Goodnight is beautiful, but maybe the most inept Bond girl of all-time. They used a SLIDE WHISTLE, ruining one of the coolest Bond stunts ever (the car jump).
- Most under-appreciated part: Nick Nack is a splendid henchman, showing the role can be more than just a strongman.

  1. Diamonds Are Forever: Great Beginning and Ending, but Bad Everywhere Else
- Why it's this high: Is there another Bond with such a great contrast between the beginning/ending and everything in between? Connery shows his tough side, as he muscles his way through the pre-credits scene. Particularly good was the part where he seduces the woman, then uses her bikini top to choke her. At the end, Bond expertly uses his wine knowledge to detect something is amiss, then dispatches Kidd and Wint in style. Other cool scenes include Bond scaling the building to reach Blofeld and Bond driving the Mustang through the alley.
- Why it's not higher: This is one of the films that I find myself liking less and less over time. Vegas, and especially the space laboratory scene, just seem cheesy. Connery is officially too old at this point, and Jill St. John just isn't a very compelling Bond girl. I would've preferred to have seen more of Plenty O'Toole, but alas 'twas not meant to be. Leiter is uninspired as well. Having Bond go after Blofeld for the millionth time just seems tired at this point.
- Most under-appreciated part: Mr. Kidd and Wint are the creepiest henchmen in the Bond universe, but I'd argue they are some of the best. Their banter and creative modes of execution are quite chilling and thrilling.

  1. A View to a Kill: Best Theme
- Why it's this high: Is it a hot take to not have View in the bottom five? Let me explain. I contend Duran Duran's theme is the very best. The ending fight scene on the Golden Gate Bridge is actually one of the most iconic ending set pieces in the series. The plot is stellar on paper, as the horse racing part was a very Bondian side story, and the idea of an attack on Silicon Valley actually seems even more plausible today.
- Why it's not higher: It's self-evident that Moore is way too old for the part. Some parts are just mind-blowingly ridiculous, such as the fire truck chase scene through San Francisco and the part where Stacey is caught unaware by a blimp behind her. Speaking of Stacey, she may be beautiful, but she spends most of the movie shrieking whenever something goes wrong.
- Most under-appreciated part: The scene with Bond and Ivanova is cool (I always like it when he interacts with other spies) and quite entertaining how he fools her with the cassettes.

Tier 5: Below Average
  1. Octopussy: The Most Characteristically Roger Moore Bond Film
- Why it's this high: Maud Adams has great screen presence as Octopussy, and her Amazonian-like women are cool to watch fight. Bond's deft swipe of the egg was nicely done. On a related aside, I wish Bond films would emphasize Bond's intellect more, as it seems the 60s and 70s films would allow Bond to showcase his vast knowledge more frequently than he does today. Gobinda is a fierce henchman, while India in general is a cool location. The plot is realistic, yet grand (war-mongering Russian general tries to detonate a nuke to get NATO to turn on itself).
- Why it's not higher: This is the first Moore film where he simply was too old and shouldn't have been cast. Yes, it's too cheesy at times, most infamously during the Tarzan yell. Bond also doesn't use any cool vehicles.
- Most under-appreciated part: People tend to focus too much on Bond dressing as a clown, but the scene where Bond furiously tries to get to the bomb in time to defuse it is one of the tensest moments in the series. Moore's "Dammit there's a bomb in there!" really demonstrated the gravity of the situation (I get goosebumps during that part).

  1. Tomorrow Never Dies: Most Tasteful Humor
- Why it's this high: Brosnan really settles into the role well here. He gives the most charismatic Bond performance in 15 years or so. His quip "I'm just here at Oxford, brushing up on a little Danish" is an all-time great Bond line. Teri Hatcher is stunning as Paris Carver, delivering a memorable performance with her limited screen time. The plot is original and ages well, highlighting the potential downsides of media power, while Carver is an above average villain.
- Why it's not higher: Wai Lin is good for action, but the chemistry between her and Bond is non-existent. By the end of the movie, Pryce just seem silly (especially the scene where he mocks Wai Lin's martial arts skills). There aren't any good Bond allies, as Jack Wade doesn't impress in his return to the franchise. In general though, the movie has few things terribly wrong with it, it just doesn't excel in many ways.
- Most under-appreciated part: Dr. Kaufman is hysterical. At first, I thought "this is weird," but by the end of the scene I'm cracking up. I genuinely wish they found someway to bring him back for World, but c'est la vie.

  1. The World Is Not Enough: Less than the Sum of its Parts
- Why it's this high: According to my spreadsheet, this is a top 10 Bond film, while on my first watch on this film I thought it was bottom five. I think the truth is that it's somewhere in between. I like the settings, everything from the temporary MI-6 headquarters to Azerbaijan. Elektra is an all-time great Bond girl, with a nice plot twist and character arc. The glasses where Bond sees through women's clothing are hilarious. The sense of danger is strong, with everyone from Bond to M being in danger. The return of Zukovsky is a nice plus.
- Why it's not higher: I think two things really doom this film. First, Renard is totally wasted a henchman. The idea of him not feeling pain is a cool one, but he just seems boring and extraneous. I don't even think Carlyle acted poorly, he was just misused. Secondly, the ending (after Bond killing Elektra which is quite good) is rather terrible. The whole scene in the sub just isn't entertaining or engaging.
- Most under-appreciated part: I'm going to defend Denise Richards as Christmas Jones. Although no Ursula Andress, Richards is absolutely gorgeous and did not actively make Bond's mission more difficult, which is more than some Bond girls can say *cough Britt Ekland. In particular, I found her introductory scene to be quite memorable and convincing. Also, the Christmas quip at the end is quite cheeky.

Tier 4: Solid
  1. The Living Daylights:
- Why it's this high: Dalton brings a breath of fresh air to the franchise here. His more serious take makes for interesting movies that seem more unique than most. I'm happy to see this subreddit appreciate Dalton more than the casual fun does, but I wouldn't go as far as the Dalton fanboys and say he's the best Bond or anything like that. I do wish he got the role sooner and did more films. Moving on to Daylights, it's got a good intro for Dalton and good plot in general. Surprisingly, Bond's fidelity doesn't bother me one bit, as it actually makes sense that Kara falls in love with James by the end, given all they've gone through.
- Why it's not higher: The biggest reason is that the villain is just terrible. Whitaker seems silly and pathetic, a terrible contrast to Dalton's serious nature. I think Whitaker might be the worst in the series, and a Bond movie can't be great without a good villain. Also, Dalton doesn't have much charm and is abysmal at one-liners, which, in my opinion, IS a facet of the perfect James Bond.
- Most under-appreciated part: The Aston Martin Vantage is a beautiful car, and the chase scene across the ice is great! It's both exciting and funny! Not sure why people don't talk about this chase scene and this car more; it's arguably the highlight of the movie for me.

  1. Thunderball: The Most Beautiful
- Why it's this high: Thunderball used to be top five for me and here is why. The underwater scenes, the setting, the score, and the Bond girls are beautiful even to this day. Domino is excellent, while Volpe is a tour de force, oozing sexuality and danger. I think the underwater parts are interesting and novel, creating a staple of sorts for the franchise. The DB 5 is always welcome, and the jetpack use was quite cool for the time (and to some extent now).
- Why it's not higher: Some would say it's boring, while I would more generously admit the plot is slow. Furthermore, the theme song is all-time bad (apparently they could have used Johnny Cash!!!), and there is no great henchman for Bond to dispatch.
- Most under-appreciated part: Two plot ideas I liked a lot: Bond being injured and needing rehab, plus the part where all the 00s meet up and then are sent to the corners of the globe.

  1. Never Say Never Again: Guilty Pleasure
- Why it's this high: Rewatching Never for the third time, I was struck by how fun this movie is. It's exciting, funny, and fast-paced. Basically, it's a more exciting version of Thunderball, with better pacing and better humor. I think Irvin Kershner did a great job managing this star studded cast. Carrera is a firecracker as Blush, Sydow is a convincing Blofeld, and Basinger is a classic Bond girl. Connery clearly has a blast returning to the role, doing a great job despite his advanced age. If anything, this one might not be ranked high enough.
- Why it's not higher: The music is terrible. Normally I don't notice these things, but one can't help but notice how dreadful this one is. The theme is awful as well. I'd argue this is the worst music of any Bond film.
- Most under-appreciated part: The humor! This is one of the funniest Bonds, as I found myself laughing out loud at various parts (e.g. Mr Bean!).

  1. The Spy Who Loved Me: Best Intro
- Why it's this high: There's a lot to love about this one, so I get why this ranks highly for many. It is simply the best introduction, starting with Bond romancing a woman, followed by a skii chase, then jumping off the cliff and pulling the Union Jack parachute! The Lotus is a top 3 Bond car. Jaws is a superb henchman. Triple X was an excellent Bond girl, deadly, charming, and beautiful. Of course, Moore is charming and the locations are exotic (Egypt was a cool locale). If I had to pick one Moore movie for a newcomer to watch, it would be this one.
- Why it's not higher: The theme song is bad, and Stromberg is a below average villain. I also think the last 45 minutes or so of the movie kind of drags.
- Most under-appreciated part: The whole dynamic between Bond and Triple X is great. Whenever Bond movies show Bond squaring off against other spies (see View to a Kill, Goldeneye) it's just a pleasure to watch.

  1. Live and Let Die: Most Suave
- Why it's this high: Roger Moore superbly carves out his own take on Bond in an excellent addition to the franchise. The boat chase is my favorite in the series, and Live and Let Die is my second favorite theme. Jane Seymour is a good Bond girl, while Tee Hee and Kananga are a solid villain/henchman duo. Unpopular opinion: I find J.W. Pepper to be hilarious.
- Why it's not higher: The introduction isn't very good, as Bond isn't even included! The second climax with the voodoo isn't great. Bond blowing up Kananga has aged terribly.
- Most under-appreciated part: When Bond is visited in his apartment by M and Moneypenny, Bond rushes to hide his girl from his coworkers. Finally, when they leave and he unzips the dress with his magnetic watch is one of the best uses of a Bond gadget in the series, showcasing why Moore might be the most charming Bond of them all.

  1. You Only Live Twice: Best Blofeld
- Why it's this high: Just your classic, fun Sean Connery Bond movie. It was a great decision to send Bond to Japan for his first Asian visit, giving the movie a fresh feel. The ending set piece battle is potentially the best of this staple of 60s/70s Bonds. Tiger Tanaka is one of Bond's cooler allies. Pleasance killed it as Blofeld; when I think of Blofeld, I think of his take. In what could have been cheesy, he is actually somewhat frightening.
- Why it's not higher: The whole "we need to make you look Japanese" part seems both unrealistic (who is he really fooling?) plus surprisingly impotent coming from Tiger Tanaka who seems to be a competent and connected man otherwise. Honestly though, this movie doesn't have a major weakness.
- Most under-appreciated part: The fight scene with the guard in the executive's office is probably the best hand-to-hand fight in the series up until that point.

Tier 3: Excellent
  1. Dr. No: The Most Spy-Like
- Why it's this high: Nearly 60 years later, this film is still a blast to watch, due in no small part to its focus on the little things of being a spy. I adore the scenes where Bond does the little things spies (presumably) do, such as putting a hair across the door, or showing Bond playing solitaire while waiting to spring his trap on Prof. Dent. I also enjoy the suspense of Bond sleuthing around the island, while he and the viewer are completely unaware of whom the villain is until quite late in the film. It's easy to take for granted now, but this film established so many series traditions that were ingenious. My personal favorite is Bond's introduction at the card table: "Bond .... James Bond."
- Why it's not higher: The film just doesn't have the payoff it deserves. Maybe it's just a result of the time and budget, but from the point Bond escapes on, it's just mediocre. Particularly egregious is the "fight" between Dr. No and Bond where No meets his demise.
- Most under-appreciated part: Ursula Andress was a surprisingly well developed Bond girl, with a shockingly violent backstory (she was raped!). Obviously, she is beautiful and the beach scene is iconic, but I was pleasantly surprised to conclude she is more than just eye candy.

  1. License to Kill: The Grittiest
- Why it's this high: On my first watch, this was my least favorite Bond film, as I thought it was too dark and violent to befit 007. By my third time watching, I've decided it's actually one of the best. Fortunately, I don't have to go on my "Ackshually, Dalton did a good job" rant with this subreddit. I liked the wedding intro and the concept of a revenge arc for Leiter (although come on he should've been killed by a freaking shark). Also, Lamora and (especially) Bouvier are great Bond girls. Bouvier is both competent and beautiful, and it's great to see Bond choose her at the end.
- Why it's not higher: The theme song is atrocious, Dalton is so angry (dare I say charmless?) the whole time it's almost puzzling why Bouvier and Lamora fall for him, and Bond doesn't use any cool vehicles.
- Most under-appreciated part: Sanchez is actually a sneaky good Bond villain.

  1. For Your Eyes Only: The Most Underrated
- Why it's this high: I think Moore is a bit underrated as Bond. Yes, he was too old towards the end and yes, his movies were at times too campy, but he himself played the role admirably. He was the most charming and witty of all the Bonds, so by the time he got his first relatively serious plot to work with, he hit it out of the park. Anyhow, the climactic mountaintop assault is one of my favorite Bond action climaxes. Columbo is one of the best Bond allies, and the plot twist where he turns out to be good and Kristatos bad was well-done.
- Why it's not higher: The intro is just silly. Bibi's romantic infatuation with Bond is just ...er... uncomfortable?
- Most under-appreciated part: The theme song is a banger. What a chorus!

Tier 2: Exceptional
  1. Skyfall: The Sharpest Film (From Plot to Aesthetics)
- Why it's this high: One of the best plots of the entire series. The idea of an older Bond who had lost a step, along with making M the focus point of the movie, works very well. Seeing Bond's childhood home is also pretty cool. Bardem's take on Silva is delightful and a lot of fun to watch. Even the cinematography is a series peak, while Adele's them is excellent.
- Why it's not higher: One thing most Craig Bond films suffer from is the lack of a Bond-worthy henchman. Skyfall is no exception. More importantly, Bond girls are mostly irrelevant to the film. Yes, Severine is both beautiful and interesting, but she's scarcely twenty minutes of the film.
- Most under-appreciated part: Setting the new supporting characters up nicely. The Moneypenny backstory was well-done. Casting Ralph Fiennes as the new M is a great choice in of itself, but he also got a nice chuck of background story to help us going forward.

  1. Casino Royale: The First Bond Film I'd Show a Series Newcomer
- Why it's this high: Craig's take on Bond feels like a breath of fresh air. In particular, his hand-to-hand combat scenes are so much better (and more believable) than any other Bond. The parkour chase scene is one of the best chase scenes in the series. Le Chifre is an excellent villain, but, more importantly, Vesper is an all-time great Bond girl. The conversation between Vesper and Bond on the train is probably the most interesting of any film. Bonus points for Jeffrey Wright as Leiter and the Aston Martin DBS.
- Why it's not higher: There are hardly any humorous parts or much charm displayed by Bond in general. More importantly, the movie should have just ended when Bond wakes up in rehab. The rest of the movie feels confused and superfluous.
- Most under-appreciated part: The decision to change from chemin de fer to poker makes for much better (and understandable!) cinema. The poker scenes are the best of Bond's many gambling scenes throughout the series.

  1. Goldeneye: The Most Fun
- Why it's this high: Wow, rewatching Goldeneye I was struck by how entertaining the whole thing is. The opening jump is breath taking, the scene where Bond drives his evaluator around is hilarious, and Xenia Onatopp is a livewire. Sean Bean is a formidable villain as 006, and a great foil to James. Bond and Judi Dench's first scene together is amazing. Goldeneye feels like the first modern Bond, yet so true to the predecessors. Wade and especially Zukovsky are excellent allies.
- Why it's not higher: Simonova is a forgettable Bond girl. She's not annoying, unattractive, or acted poorly, but is just below average in most regards (looks, back story, chemistry with Bond, plot).
- Most under-appreciated part: the action is just so much better than any Bond before it

  1. From Russia with Love: The Best Henchman (Red Grant)
- Why it's this high: Interesting settings, beautiful women, and an engaging story make this a classic. I'm not the first to point out that the scenes with Grant and Bond aboard the train are some of the best in the entire series. Grant is one of the few villains who feels like a match for 007. Furthermore, the addition of Desmond Llewyn as Q was crucial and Kerim Bey is one of the better Bond allies.
- Why it's not higher: The helicopter scene should've just been omitted, especially when combined with the subsequent boat chase. It's just awkward to watch.
- Most under-appreciated part: The gypsy scenes are quite exotic and entertaining.

  1. On Her Majesty's Secret Service: The Most Heartfelt
- Why it's this high: James and Tracy's love story is charming, and when she dies at the end, this is the one and only time in the entire series where the viewer feels genuinely sad. Diana Rigg did an excellent job convincing the audience Bond could finally fall in love with one girl. The skiing scenes were beautifully filmed, and the score was exemplary. Personally, I quite liked Lazenby's take; however, some of his lines and jokes fall flat. To his credit, he looks and acts like Bond more than any other actor.
- Why it's not higher: Honestly, it does drag at times in the first half, plus there is no theme song!
- Most under-appreciated part: Bond's Aston Martin DBS is a beautiful car, combining 60's sports-car beauty with Aston Martin's elegance.

Tier 1: The Best
  1. Goldfinger: The quintessential Bond
- Why it's this high: From the opening ("Positively shocking") to the seduction of Pussy Galore at the end, this film has it all. Goldfinger is an all time great villain, while Odd Job is an exceptional henchman. Connery delivers a master performance, and drives THE classic Bond Car, ejector seat included. The reason I put it #1 is not necessarily because it is the best film (although it is great), it checks all the boxes of what a perfect Bond film should do.
- Why it's not higher: I cannot think of any notable imperfections.
- Most under-appreciated part: The golf scene between Bond and Goldfinger is a delight to watch, demonstrating Bond's wits for the first and only time on the golf course.
submitted by BoolaBoola19 to JamesBond [link] [comments]

I freaking love Spectre (James Bond)

God where do I begin. Seeing as this is a casual conversation I will go to the begging. For context I’m 15 so I wasn’t there for the classics on release.
As far as I can remember I have always loved James Bond, although I was no different to many other kids. The cars, explosions, bad guys and music where always so cool to me, not to mention 007 himself. Goldfinger was always my favourite mainly because of the laser scene where goldfinger strapped James to a chair as a laser started to slowly rise to his crotch. It was a thrill to see how he would make it out of that one and it’s always stuck with me.
Now I’m certainly no super fan but i would say I know the series more than most people but it doesn’t mean I’m perfect and I’m sure to get things wrong. None the less when I first watched Skyfall it was so crazy to me. The comedy, plot twists, action and atmosphere, the movie had it all. It also made me really appreciate Daniel Craig who I think is easily one of the best bonds out there. I must have watched it when I was about 8 in 2013 and I fell in love with the film and our family got it on dvd to watch whenever.
This got me to watch casino royale and quantum of solace which are both great movies in my opinion. Everyone is entitled to one and it turns out mine is different to most people. Anyway when my family heard spectre was coming out it was just a waiting game to book tickets to the cinema to watch it. I was 10 and being 10 I didn’t understand a lot of the film but still loved it so much. Now we are done with the backstory we can get to what made me write this out.
About 2 hours ago ITV was playing spectre and as it was late and I was the only one downstairs I rewinded it to the begging. As soon as I seen the first scene it all came back to me, yet it had been about 3~ years since I had rewatched it so I forgot the small things. But now it seemed so much better. I would bore you guys to death if you wanted me to talk about what I loved about it the most so Ill condense it into a couple of things. My top 5 favourite scenes in order. What the movie did strongly. What I liked about the story.
I think the most obvious thing to talk about is the score. The music that was written for this film is beautiful and it fits it so goddamn well. Writing on the wall was a perfect choice to start but just every scene felt like the score was carrying a lot of the mood. Another thing I want to touch on is the acting and it is incredible. I think Daniel Craig plays Bond perfectly and all the other cast really sold their roles especially Christoph Waltz, oh boy does he play the perfect villain. His performance is incredible and I hope he won some awards for that. The shots are really incredible as well. The whole film is shot in such a way that just works super super well. The locations are perfect, the way light and darkness / colour theory is played into it also really stands out. The practical effects are amazing and the cgi is very good as well. Now I’ll move over the top 5 scenes.
I’m gonna do this in chronological order so it makes sense but they all work so well.
  1. The Mr Hinx intro scene. After James killed one of spectres elite assassins they need someone to fill in. One of the members steps up claiming to fill the role perfectly. Just as everyone thinks it is over a big tall guy walks in from behind, picks up the member and gouges his eyes out with his thumbs, pushing his body to the side and sitting in his chair. This scene is done perfectly. It gives a sense of power dynamic and fear, as all it takes is a man with no remorse to suck the life out of someone as dangerous as himself. Putting himself in the chair makes it so he has replaced the old member in the blink of an eye. It is a powerful scene and can be pretty gruesome
  2. Mr white death scene. Bond is going to Mr White, an old enemy of his, to extort information of him. When bond finds him he finds out that mr white was poisoned with thallium and is slowly dying. He let down spectre so they betrayed me white. He knows bond hasn’t come here to kill him, it was for information. The mood is cold and quiet. It is set in an old wood cabin in Austria. James gives Mr white his gun to prove he isn’t here to kill him so mr white tells him his daughter knows how to get to Franz so in turn tells bond how to get to his daughter. He then says ,”you are like a small kite, slowly heading towards a hurricane” before shooting himself in the head with bonds gun. I think it’s pretty self explanatory why this scene is good. It completely changes the time from an action comedy into a serious thriller. It is very intense and is quite shocking. Bond enables his death and has to live with that the rest of his life. And it was only the two of them in the house, leaving bond alone.
  3. Mr Hinx train fight. Bond and Madeleine (Mr whites daughter) are heading to meet Franz to kill him, they are getting there by train. They are drinking cocktails when Mr Hinx shows up and smashes bond threw the table. Then they have an intense fight where all they have is the things around them. What makes this scene good is the lack of music. All you can hear are the actual noises in the train. It makes every punch more real and personal, showing what it is like in bonds perspective. The music kicks in when it all seems lost for bond and an intense score is added before they best mr Hinx. I think choosing not to have music was an extremely smart move and made that fight scene great.
  4. Franz Oberhauser drill scene. I can’t really add in a description of what happens in this one so I’ll leave a link, Trust me and give it a watch. Franz Oberhauser Scene. What makes this my second favourite bit in the film is how unnerving and how uncomfortable I was . I hate this scene for all the reasons they want you too. The white room enables no emotion, the restraints make you feel trapped. The sound of a whirring drill and bond trying to resist crying out in pain. It was hard to watch. As I have said I really think Christoph waltz really sold this scene as a cynical sadist who enjoyed watching others suffer. I was holding my neck the entire time even though I knew bond would be safe. I loved this scene and it really changes the film from an 8 to a 9.
  5. Franz Oberhauser glass wall. Bond has been kidnapped and led to the MI6 building that had previously been blown up in skyfall. Walking down the directed path from red arrows he finds himself opposite of Franz, all that separates them is a thick bulletproof glass wall. It is here we find out that Franz is James’ step brother and he killed their father out of spite. The shot moves in the middle of the glass, Franz and James perfectly opposite. But there is a crucial detail. You can see Franz’ reflection in the glass onto James but not vica versa. It symbolises how Franz and James are truly no different and how all Franz is doing is talking to his own reflection. I think it is a beautiful scene. It has an incredible metaphor and adds so much weight to the situation. It makes you wonder if 007 is really the good guy
If you couldn’t tell I VERY much enjoyed rewatching it. I now understand that it is a lot more than James saving the day. I’m not gonna blab on so all I’m going to say is... spectre is incredibly shot, directed, acted, scored and all around great. Highly recommend to anyone and I would love to read some of your responses. And remember you have a voice too, don’t be afraid to call me out or point out why I’m wrong. This is a casual convo about a movie I like a lot.
submitted by henry_hoover_ to CasualConversation [link] [comments]

(Fan) Casino Royale Radio Drama (2007) - Director's Cut (2020)

https://circus13.com/james-bond-007-in-casino-royale-the-directors-cut/
Hey folks! Hope fan productions aren't an issue, but if you are interested, here's an updated version of an old show I did a while back!
Director's Cut Edition
Casino Royale was originally released February 19, 2007 to July 26, 2009 across six episodes lasting approximately two hours. This streamlined version consists of one 55-minute episode that I believe improves on the original and focuses more on being an audio drama, not an audio book
After the release of Die Another Day and the announcement Casino Royale would be the next Bond film, I feared the last Fleming novel would get the same treatment. In 2005, I initiated pre-production on the audio drama, wanting to ensure there was a faithful adaptation. However, I may have been a little too faithful!
As the first show I had ever done, I had hoped for something more akin to traditional audio drama. However, it didn’t quite turn out that way. The finished product was, well, a little wordy! Large chunks of unnecessary narration from the Fleming novel resulted in a mix of half audio drama/half audio book.
This director’s cut seeks to come closer to the original vision by stripping back the extensive/unnecessary narration sequences and removing the “audio book” element.
The Story
Introducing James Bond: charming, sophisticated, handsome; chillingly ruthless and very deadly. Casino Royale finds Bond on a mission to neutralize a lethal, high-rolling Russian operative called simply 'Le Chiffre', who has lost 50 million Francs of his nation's money on a private venture, and unless he can recoup his losses, a SMERSH assassin lies in wait. James Bond 007 is sent to beat Le Chiffre at the casino and ensure Le Chiffre's death comes at the hands of his own people.
What changed?
The master recordings no longer exist, therefore, all edits had to be made to the final MP3’s already mixed which brings severe limitations. The major changes are deletion of several narration scenes. Several scenes have been restructured. Some narrations that I would have like to have paired down, could not be removed due the mix or negative impact it would have on story development. No new material was added with the exception of several new music cues to bridge some of the new edits.
Sound Quality
There are inconsistencies with the sound quality of the voice recordings and sound effects due to youthful inexperience and the first time ever making a radio show. Unfortunately, as no master recordings remain, this could not be corrected.
And yes, I know Bond doesn't have a British accent, but I was a teen and didn't have many casting choices, hahaha! :)
submitted by testgumby69 to audiodrama [link] [comments]

(Fan) Casino Royale Radio Drama (2007) - Director's Cut (2020)

https://soundcloud.com/user-857503337/casino-royale-directors-cut
Hey folks! Hope fan productions aren't an issue, but if you are interested, here's an updated version of an old show I did a while back! Maybe it will help tide you over until NTTD!
Also working on a new show if you want to audition: https://www.reddit.com/audiodrama/comments/ietqmb/casting_call_commander_bond_cmg_rmv
Director's Cut Edition
Casino Royale was originally released February 19, 2007 to July 26, 2008 across six episodes lasting approximately two hours. This streamlined version consists of one 55-minute episode that I believe improves on the original and focuses more on being an audio drama, not an audio book
After the release of Die Another Day and the announcement Casino Royale would be the next Bond film, I feared the last Fleming novel would get the same treatment. In 2005, I initiated pre-production on the audio drama, wanting to ensure there was a faithful adaptation. However, I may have been a little too faithful!
As the first show I had ever done, I had hoped for something more akin to traditional audio drama. However, it didn’t quite turn out that way. The finished product was, well, a little wordy! Large chunks of unnecessary narration from the Fleming novel resulted in a mix of half audio drama/half audio book.
This director’s cut seeks to come closer to the original vision by stripping back the extensive/unnecessary narration sequences and removing the “audio book” element.
The Story
Introducing James Bond: charming, sophisticated, handsome; chillingly ruthless and very deadly. Casino Royale finds Bond on a mission to neutralize a lethal, high-rolling Russian operative called simply 'Le Chiffre', who has lost 50 million Francs of his nation's money on a private venture, and unless he can recoup his losses, a SMERSH assassin lies in wait. James Bond 007 is sent to beat Le Chiffre at the casino and ensure Le Chiffre's death comes at the hands of his own people.
What changed?
The master recordings no longer exist, therefore, all edits had to be made to the final MP3’s already mixed which brings severe limitations. The major changes are deletion of several narration scenes. Several scenes have been restructured. Some narrations that I would have like to have paired down, could not be removed due the mix or negative impact it would have on story development. No new material was added with the exception of several new music cues to bridge some of the new edits.
Sound Quality
There are inconsistencies with the sound quality of the voice recordings and sound effects due to youthful inexperience and the first time ever making a radio show. Unfortunately, as no master recordings remain, this could not be corrected.
And yes, I know Bond doesn't have a British accent, but I was a teen and didn't have many casting choices, hahaha! :)
submitted by testgumby69 to JamesBond [link] [comments]

The Next James Bond: Back to the Cold War

It looks like the Daniel Craig 007 is coming to an end with No Time To Die, but the series will undoubtedly continue. Craig's Bond in many ways is the definitive modern Bond. The central theme across all his movies has been: "How does Bond fit into the modern world? Has the world passed him by?" It's a very contemporary take on the character, and it's probably the best way to approach a modernized version of Bond. Starting all the way back with Casino Royale the Craig films have aimed to be an examination of 007 as a concept.
So after No Time To Die, the question becomes: what do you do next? I'm not talking about casting, I'm talking about the overall direction of the series. The philosophy behind the next instalment, post-Daniel Craig. I don't think you can come back and do another modern meta-critique of the character, it's time to do something different to set it apart from Craig.
So my proposal to reignite the franchise would be to make it a period movie. Have the story set in the time when the very first Bond movie was released, 1962. This was the golden age of espionage, the Cold War. By changing the time period like this, it would be different from the most recent Craig-version, while at the same time being a throwback to classic 007. Of course, this wouldn't be a remake or reboot of the Connery films, simply new 007 stories set during the height of the Cold War.
So the next time Bond lands in theatres, is this something you'd be interested in seeing? Or do you want them to keep moving forward with the modernized 007?
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The Clarkson Review: Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante (Oct. 13)

The Clarkson Review: Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante (Oct. 13)
Of course I will go and see the new James Bond film, but I almost certainly won't enjoy it. I haven't really enjoyed any of them since Daniel Craig took over.
I know he wants his Bond to be fallible and weak, like the character in the books, but I don't want to see 007 swigging Heineken from a bottle that just happens to be label-side out, and I don't want to see him bleed, or fire his gun at something and miss. I want him to be Roger Moore, the cheeky chappie who could speak Latin, fly a space shuttle and lay anyone low with one of his signature karate chops.
Craig's Bond can't do that. In fact, if you actually stop and think what he's done in the past, you'd have to conclude he's completely useless. In Casino Royale, he didn't notice that the woman he'd fallen in love with was spying for the other side, and then, despite his best efforts, he let her drown in a lift. The next woman he lurved, in Skyfall, got shot in the head by a former colleague. Oh, and then he took an old woman who needed to go into hiding to his own bloody house. Where she and 007's gamekeeper wandered about on a darkened moor, with a torch, just in case the baddies needed even more help locating her.
Before that happened, though, Bond went to interview someone in Shanghai and ended up throwing him off a skyscraper. And in an earlier scene, he was shot by Miss Moneypenny. I'm telling you, Johnny English is better at espionage than this guy. So's Inspector Clouseau.
But the worst bit in Skyfall came when the director Sam Mendes decided to blow up Bond's Aston Martin. So he pumped it full of bullets until it exploded.
I'm sure, to the luvvie-in-chief, this was fine, because a car is just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. But a car is not just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. And Bond's Aston is more of a car than most. It has been a part of my life since I was four. I have owned many models, including one that would fire a small man under the sofa. And Mendes blew it up so he could get Craig to do some acting. I considered at the time filling Sam's dog with bullets until it exploded, just to show him how it felt.
The car was put back together in the next Bond film, Spectre — and it appears in the new movie as well — but it was like making Ring of Bright Water 2 and trying to argue that someone had sewn the otter's head back on.
I bet Aston Martin had a duck fit when it saw the DB5 reduced to a smouldering ruin, because Bond is its marketing department. He is its PR machine and its ad agency and its ambassador all rolled into one. So I bet it really did try to sew the DB5's head back on, because without 007, the company would have to maintain a public profile on its own. And it doesn't have the cash for that.
I'm not sure it even had enough cash to develop the car you see before you today. It's called — deep breath — the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante, and sometimes you get the impression that you're tootling about in almost two tons of make-do and mend. With a bit of cast-off Mercedes tech to maintain a veneer of modernity.
To create it, Aston had to chop the roof off a normal DBS, but this meant finding somewhere to put the electric roof mechanism. That meant rerouting the massive exhaust system and that meant turning the fuel tank round and redesigning every body panel aft of the doors.
The company managed it, but sometimes the roof doesn't go down when you operate the switch, the boot is laughably tiny, and it gets so hot in there, owing to the exhaust system, you could roast a chicken. There's also a problem with the interior. Astonishingly, we got four adults in it, and that's impressive, but it is almost identical to the interior you get in a far cheaper DB11 Volante. And that's not good enough.
The basic starting price of the DBS Superleggera Volante is £247,500 and, I'm sorry, but if I'm going to blow a quarter of a million on a car, I don't want it to have the same innards as a car that costs almost £90,000 less. The trouble is, of course, that when you've spent all that money turning the fuel tank round, there simply won't be enough left to do the air vents as well. Or fit a glovebox.
It sounds like I have a real downer on this car, and I haven't finished yet, I'm afraid. Because superleggera is Italian for "superlight", and it just isn't. With a couple of people on board, it weighs more than two tons. Perhaps that's why it endlessly catches its chin-mounted skid plates on speed humps. And why its tyres are so thin you need to be very careful when you're parking, even against a dropped pavement, or you'll kerb the wheels. Perhaps Aston should have called it Supergrasso.
You can feel this weight when you're driving, too. It doesn't come across as a feisty little whizz-bang; it's no water boatman. But that said, it's fast. Rocket-ship fast. It's almost too fast, because on wet roads you would be well advised to treat the throttle with extreme caution or you will have a crash. You even need to be careful sometimes on dry roads.
And that raises a question. If you can't unleash all the volcanic fury without the back end having a few moments of panic, then why not save yourself the best part of £90,000 and get the DB11 Volante instead? Because you can exploit all the power in one of those, all of the time.And it has the same interior. And it's a little bit more civilised and comfortable.
It's almost as though Aston bit off more than it could chew with the DBS. Think of its engineers as pianists. They're accomplished enough to impress their friends and colleagues, but they're not really able to put on a penguin suit, walk onto the stage at the Royal Albert Hall and attempt Liszt's La Campanella.
If you attempt to build a 211mph car that costs £247,000, you need to make sure that you have the money to pull it off. Yes, the DBS Superleggera Volante is one of the best-looking cars ever made, and it's blisteringly fast and it makes some laugh-out-loud noises from the tailpipes, but as a package, it's flawed.
Hopefully, the new Bond film will be a gem and will keep alive the aura that surrounds the man and the car he drives. But I wouldn't count on it. The way things are going, they'll replace Craig with Anthea Turner and give her a Nissan Leaf. And that, I fear, would bring the curtain down on Britain's best-loved car-maker.
In the meantime, if you want an Aston because you, like me, grew up worshipping them, then don't despair because the DB11 Volante is brilliant. That sort of car at that sort of price? Nobody does it better.
(Source [paywalled]): https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/clarkson-review-aston-marton-superleggera-volante-v0gz2qs0w)
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I'm waiting for James Bond to Return.

And you read that right. I feel the need to make this post, not to sit and change everyone's minds here and diss anyone of the opposing viewpoint but just to get this off my chest.

For me, Bond hasn't returned since Die Another Day and I know that's going to stir a lot of heads and maybe hate but that's fine, we're used to it by now. Growing up, as a kid my parents would watch 007 films from Connery's era to Dalton's and then Brosnan's when they rolled around int he 90s and I'm very happy and consider myself fortunate to be able to share a similar experience watching those movies with them, moreso with my dad.

My dad grew up watching a lot of Moore films and particularly Moonrakre. While he does consider it a bit silly, he always loved it and had a kick out of it in comparison to his boring day to day job as he sometimes put it. I know MR tends to get hate today because of how out of bounds it is but for me it will have a special place in my heart. Then when Brosnan became Bond he didn't get a chance to see Goldeneye initially but he saw Tomorrow Never Dies and bought it on DVD. I still have that DVD today and it's a nice memory for me because me and him would always watch it together and laugh at Q's quips, enjoy the car chase scene and everything Brosnan brought to the table. While TWINE was a darker step in tone and direction for Brosnan, I still loved the opening PTS scene and the title sequence by the awesome Shirley Manson always struck my ears in an interesting way like no other song did.

So to say the least, we've shared great Bond memories growing up and despite any movies that are considered mediocre or whatnot even like Die Another Day, it was important for us that we had fun and enjoyed it and ignored our reality. But then that changed in 2006 with Craig's debut and this is where the crux of the post really is. I've noticed there's an utmost universal praise for him and his movies (though Spectre be an exception). I always see whenever someone comments something about Brosnan being the best Bond or one of the best it's always downvoted but say anything good about Craig, even mention his name and everyone agrees with you no matter what. I don't think that's very fair and healthy, especially around here.

When Casino Royale came out I was still fairly young so I was actually a bit excited to see what this movie had to offer for me. So me and my dad got around to seeing it in theatres and I was hoping to see the same faces again despite a different Bond. I sat and sat and wondered when I'd see Q, the Cleese one at least and the same fun gadgets and car chases and quips and liners. But I didn't see any of that. Instead I saw what was a ripoff of Jason Bourne with an emotional soap opera drama story over Vesper which Craig still can't get over today like some emotionally attached ex. There was no Q, the charm and wit Brosnan brought was practically gone and years later I realized it was an "origin" story that no one had asked for.

Someone on a post recently said DAD killed the franchise and Craig saved it from that. That disgusted me to read because it was not true whatsoever, there was no reason to fire Brosnan and bring on someone else to completely wipe away 40 years of a franchise Cubby put his heart and soul into like that and then turn it into a Nolan/Jason Bourne ripoff series to keep it relevant with a particularly bland cast that isn't memorable either. In Skyfall the guy claiming to be Q right out of college computer class says "We don't make those anymore" in reference to the Goldeneye pen. That was a nice touch on adding more black spots to this era for me.

I've since turned to franchises like Mission Impossible to see a "fun Bond" in action again basically and wish Bond would return to it's older self again. It's heartbreaking to see everything turned upside down for no reason and thrown and kicking Brosnan to the curb just because he ended up with not so great scripts. It's not fair and I don't understand why Brosnan is bashed upon at all, he at least had better suits than the tight spandex suits Craig is forced to wear and looked Bond to me and such. November Man of his felt more like Bond to me than any of Craig's movies.

Sometimes I wish Brosnan was never Bond so then people would realise that without him, Bond would be dead after Dalton. It was him who saved it after Goldeneye but the sheer amount of times I see people think Craig did is really quite pathetic at this point.

I'm sure this will not be downvoted because I have said the sinful words of "Craig bad" as usual, but take a moment to reflect on this and maybe look back at this franchise and what its' become years from now because they said James Bond would return and I'm still waiting.
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I have finally watched all twenty-four James Bond movies. Here’s what I have to say about them...

Hello! Here are my Bond film ratings. They are grouped together by actor and not year of release (i.e. see Sean Connery). I gave a score out five and a little review of the film.
Some of them are short, some of them are long. Some of them were done long after watching the movie so there wasn’t a lot to say about them.
Enjoy!
Official Sean Connery - 6
Dr. No (1962) Liked 4/5 Nice start to the series. Although it’s not the first book it makes sense for everyone.
From Russia With Love (1963) Liked 4/5 Good sequel. Continues the SPECTRE plot from the first film.
Goldfinger (1964) Liked 4/5 Classic. Found the end to be a little cheesy though.
Thunderball (1965) Liked 4/5 Found it very intriguing, although I thought the beginning was a little confusing at first.
You Only Live Twice (1967) Liked 4/5 This might be my favorite from the official Connery era. I just love seeing his Bond go up against Blofeld.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) Disliked 2/5 I’m not really sure what exactly I didn’t like about this movie. Maybe it was because it felt like there was nothing happening in this imo. Bond goes to Vegas... now what?
George Lazenby - 1
On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969) Loved 5/5 Very close adaptation. George Lazenby is one of my top 3 Bonds
Roger Moore - 7
Live And Let Die (1973) Loved 5/5 First Moore film and great start to era.
The Man With The Golden Gun (1975) Meh 3/5 Found it be just like the 70s: cheesy. I did like the ending though.
The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) Liked 4/5 What a dynamic duo James and Anya make. Plus Jaws, who’s probably my favorite henchman. I do hope he makes a return...
Moonraker (1979) 3.5/5 Okay I liked this movie for the most part but the end just really bothered me and I don’t know why... I did like hearing Richard Kiel speak though.
For Your Eyes Only (1981) 3.5/5 Okay I thought this one was just ok. Nothing special. Found Bibi annoying as hell, which I get is the point but she was just too much to take.
Octopussy (1983) 3/5 Meh There were too many characters too keep track of, too many things going on at once.
A View To A Kill (1985) 2/5 Disliked I found this one to be boring. There wasn’t much going on in this movie, especially in the first forty-five minutes or so. Bond goes to a horse race and goes undercover to find out why Zorin is using microchips. Okay.
Timothy Dalton - 2
The Living Daylights (1987) Liked 4/5 Good start to a more serious Bond. Also Dalton looks just like how Bond is described in the books. Didn’t really like the cello chase scene though.
License To Kill (1989) Liked 4/5 I really like that this is the first rogue Bond film. I enjoyed the plot very much, how it centered on the revenge of his friend and his wife and not just on a girl.
Pierce Brosnan - 4
Golden Eye (1995) 5/5 Loved Pierce Brosnan’s first outing as Bond is one for the ages. I liked Sean Bean as the villain and the plot twist was great. Brosnan is Bond in looks and in charisma. Opening theme is now one of my favorites.
Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) 4/5 Liked For all I’ve heard about how terrible Pierce’s movies get after Goldeneye, I actually think TND wasn’t that bad. I liked it. I found the plot to be a little cliché but it was well-executed. Johnathan Pryce has always been one of my favorite actors to play a villain since I saw him as the High Sparrow in GoT. I laughed at some parts during this film and Michelle Yeoh was great as the Bond girl. I loved the end when she threw a ninja star into some guys neck.
The World Is Not Enough (1999) 3/5 Meh The movie started off great, leading me to wonder if perhaps this was going to take a darker tone, but I was wrong. It was a little campy in some spots but I didn’t mind. What bothered me was that Renard, in my opinion, seemed very under-used. I also knew Elektra was a baddie as soon as M mentioned that she told Robert King to not pay the ransom. You can’t do that and not expect someone to be angry at you.
Die Another Day (2002*) *40th Anniversary 2/5 Disliked I’ve heard a lot about this movie. I’ve heard that it is considered the worst James Bond entry in the franchise. I’ve heard it’s only okay. Well, here’s what I think of it: I thought it started out great! In fact I was actually enjoying it. I like how it started out with a darker tone, with Bond getting captured and tortured by the North Koreans and then being delivered to MI6. I liked the Cuba sequence even though it was a little bit weird with the guy still being alive despite having diamonds embedded in his face. I liked our first introduction to Jinx. Then it all went downhill from the fencing scene onwards. It did not feel like a James Bond film — it felt like a campy spy flick that comes out every few years. Yes, JB has been known for being notoriously campy during its earlier movies, especially during the Roger Moore run, but it wasn’t stupidly campy like this was: all the puns, the CGI tsunami, and the slow motion! Who directed this, Zack Snyder? It felt like the slow motion effect was used too much in this movie. I can forgive it maybe once or twice but this was just too much. I know it’s such a small thing but it still bothered me.
Daniel Craig - 5
Casino Royale (2006) 5/5 Loved Great entry to a fantastic Bond. Got rid of all the gadgets and cgi and took it right back to its core: a man on a mission. The soundtrack was simply stunning; a story told within a story. I’m simply blown away by everything. I can’t believe that this is from the same writers as DAD! Plus Eva Green... ❤️
Quantum of Solace (2008) 4/5 Liked You know for all the crap this movie gets I didn’t think it was that bad. Best watched right after Casino Royale. Works as a direct sequel, and is Bond’s quest for solace in a broken world. And again, David Arnold’s score was superb.
Skyfall (2012*) *50th Anniversary 5/5 Loved Great little references to the older films. The cinematography was just breathtaking. Wonderful casting. I especially loved Ralph Fiennes as Mallory and loved seeing Moneypenny introduced into Craig’s era of Bond. Although the score wasn’t as good as David Arnold’s, I still enjoyed it very much. The pre-title sequence was intense, and the title sequence itself was spectacular. Adele did a great job! Also that little ‘James Bond Will Return’ at the end was fun!
SPECTRE (2015) 4/5 Liked I’ll be completely honest: I did not like this movie when I first watched it. I found it to be boring and and stupid in some parts. However now that I’m done with my complete watch of the 007 series, I must say that I have judged this movie wrong. There are faults, yes, ones that I will talk about, but this movie was actually pretty good on my second rewatch. Let’s get the good out of the way first: the cinematography. Again, like Skyfall, this movie was visually stunning. The skyline shots of London and Tangier were just gorgeous. The score: I found the score to be much better this time around. Though I still prefer David Arnold over Thomas Newman, I must say that he stepped it up this time. It sounded glassy to me — which I know is a weird way of describing a score but it did to me. It sounded glassy in a good way. It sounded delicate and classy. Madeleine’s theme was my favorite! The direction: Sam Mendes does it again! Just a genius in his craft and I love what he’s done with James Bond! Now for the bad. James and Madeleine’s relationship: I know what writers were going for — A second Vesper, someone who makes Bond realize that there’s more to life than just killing. However it felt very rushed to me compared to Vesper and Bond’s relationship in Casino Royale. One minute she was telling him to get away and the next moment she’s kissing and having sex with him. I think it could’ve been better. The brother relationship between Blofeld and Bond: it was ripped straight out of Austin Powers and that was very disappointing. I expected more from the writers of Skyfall. Also the whole “author of your pain” and “cuckoo” made me roll my eyes. Monica Belluci: before this movie hit theaters it was said that Monica would be in this film as a Bond girl. I remember everyone was very excited, everyone said that she would be the best Bond girl ever. She was barely in the movie for twenty minutes, maybe fifteen tops, and she was only there to have sex with Bond and give him information. What wasted potential...
All in all, I enjoyed my watch of James Bond. I can’t wait for Bond 25 and my hope is that it’s good. I have faith in Cary. I’m also eagerly awaiting the new James Bond actor to be picked.
Now all I have to do is finish the books!
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Clarkson's Columns: In Memory of Ginger Baker & The Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante Review

Skyfall's villains can blow this one up too
The Clarkson Review: Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante (Sunday Times, Oct. 13)
Of course I will go and see the new James Bond film, but I almost certainly won't enjoy it. I haven't really enjoyed any of them since Daniel Craig took over.
I know he wants his Bond to be fallible and weak, like the character in the books, but I don't want to see 007 swigging Heineken from a bottle that just happens to be label-side out, and I don't want to see him bleed, or fire his gun at something and miss. I want him to be Roger Moore, the cheeky chappie who could speak Latin, fly a space shuttle and lay anyone low with one of his signature karate chops.
Craig's Bond can't do that. In fact, if you actually stop and think what he's done in the past, you'd have to conclude he's completely useless. In Casino Royale, he didn't notice that the woman he'd fallen in love with was spying for the other side, and then, despite his best efforts, he let her drown in a lift. The next woman he lurved, in Skyfall, got shot in the head by a former colleague. Oh, and then he took an old woman who needed to go into hiding to his own bloody house. Where she and 007's gamekeeper wandered about on a darkened moor, with a torch, just in case the baddies needed even more help locating her.
Before that happened, though, Bond went to interview someone in Shanghai and ended up throwing him off a skyscraper. And in an earlier scene, he was shot by Miss Moneypenny. I'm telling you, Johnny English is better at espionage than this guy. So's Inspector Clouseau.
But the worst bit in Skyfall came when the director Sam Mendes decided to blow up Bond's Aston Martin. So he pumped it full of bullets until it exploded.
I'm sure, to the luvvie-in-chief, this was fine, because a car is just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. But a car is not just a collection of plastic and metal and glass. And Bond's Aston is more of a car than most. It has been a part of my life since I was four. I have owned many models, including one that would fire a small man under the sofa. And Mendes blew it up so he could get Craig to do some acting. I considered at the time filling Sam's dog with bullets until it exploded, just to show him how it felt.
The car was put back together in the next Bond film, Spectre — and it appears in the new movie as well — but it was like making Ring of Bright Water 2 and trying to argue that someone had sewn the otter's head back on.
I bet Aston Martin had a duck fit when it saw the DB5 reduced to a smouldering ruin, because Bond is its marketing department. He is its PR machine and its ad agency and its ambassador all rolled into one. So I bet it really did try to sew the DB5's head back on, because without 007, the company would have to maintain a public profile on its own. And it doesn't have the cash for that.
I'm not sure it even had enough cash to develop the car you see before you today. It's called — deep breath — the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Volante, and sometimes you get the impression that you're tootling about in almost two tons of make-do and mend. With a bit of cast-off Mercedes tech to maintain a veneer of modernity.
To create it, Aston had to chop the roof off a normal DBS, but this meant finding somewhere to put the electric roof mechanism. That meant rerouting the massive exhaust system and that meant turning the fuel tank round and redesigning every body panel aft of the doors.
The company managed it, but sometimes the roof doesn't go down when you operate the switch, the boot is laughably tiny, and it gets so hot in there, owing to the exhaust system, you could roast a chicken. There's also a problem with the interior. Astonishingly, we got four adults in it, and that's impressive, but it is almost identical to the interior you get in a far cheaper DB11 Volante. And that's not good enough.
The basic starting price of the DBS Superleggera Volante is £247,500 and, I'm sorry, but if I'm going to blow a quarter of a million on a car, I don't want it to have the same innards as a car that costs almost £90,000 less. The trouble is, of course, that when you've spent all that money turning the fuel tank round, there simply won't be enough left to do the air vents as well. Or fit a glovebox.
It sounds like I have a real downer on this car, and I haven't finished yet, I'm afraid. Because superleggera is Italian for "superlight", and it just isn't. With a couple of people on board, it weighs more than two tons. Perhaps that's why it endlessly catches its chin-mounted skid plates on speed humps. And why its tyres are so thin you need to be very careful when you're parking, even against a dropped pavement, or you'll kerb the wheels. Perhaps Aston should have called it Supergrasso.
You can feel this weight when you're driving, too. It doesn't come across as a feisty little whizz-bang; it's no water boatman. But that said, it's fast. Rocket-ship fast. It's almost too fast, because on wet roads you would be well advised to treat the throttle with extreme caution or you will have a crash. You even need to be careful sometimes on dry roads.
And that raises a question. If you can't unleash all the volcanic fury without the back end having a few moments of panic, then why not save yourself the best part of £90,000 and get the DB11 Volante instead? Because you can exploit all the power in one of those, all of the time.And it has the same interior. And it's a little bit more civilised and comfortable.
It's almost as though Aston bit off more than it could chew with the DBS. Think of its engineers as pianists. They're accomplished enough to impress their friends and colleagues, but they're not really able to put on a penguin suit, walk onto the stage at the Royal Albert Hall and attempt Liszt's La Campanella.
If you attempt to build a 211mph car that costs £247,000, you need to make sure that you have the money to pull it off. Yes, the DBS Superleggera Volante is one of the best-looking cars ever made, and it's blisteringly fast and it makes some laugh-out-loud noises from the tailpipes, but as a package, it's flawed.
Hopefully, the new Bond film will be a gem and will keep alive the aura that surrounds the man and the car he drives. But I wouldn't count on it. The way things are going, they'll replace Craig with Anthea Turner and give her a Nissan Leaf. And that, I fear, would bring the curtain down on Britain's best-loved car-maker.
In the meantime, if you want an Aston because you, like me, grew up worshipping them, then don't despair because the DB11 Volante is brilliant. That sort of car at that sort of price? Nobody does it better ?
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He's not around to beat me, so I'll say it: Ginger was only the world's second-best drummer (Sunday Times, Oct. 13)
The drummer Ginger Baker died last week and everyone was very surprised because we all assumed the drug-addled wild man from Cream and Blind Faith had shuffled off this mortal coil years ago. It's customary, of course, when someone dies to gloss over their shortcomings and concentrate instead on their work for charity and their heroics in the war. But this is nigh-on impossible with Baker, who was almost certainly the most unpleasant man ever to grace a stage. He pulled a knife on Cream's bass player, Jack Bruce. He used his fists to settle almost every dispute. He broke the nose of the director who made a documentary about him with his walking stick.
Then, of course, there was the naked 11-year-old girl featured on the cover of Blind Faith's only album. That's such a difficult issue these days, none of the obituaries even mentioned it.
Instead, everyone concentrated on Baker's skills as a musician — but even here people missed the point, because despite what he claimed, he wasn't the best drummer the world has ever seen. Thanks to Mitch Mitchell, who played with Jimi Hendrix, he was the second best. I'm on Twitter if you want to argue.
Baker, however, could keep perfect time, even when he was full of heroin, which is quite an achievement. And he could maintain four different cross rhythms with each of his limbs. This is like rubbing your tummy, patting your head, pumping up a lilo and playing hopscotch all at the same time.
I have a drum kit. It's an enormous Pictures of Lily limited edition replica.
And after several years of weekly lessons, I developed a profound admiration for drummers, because they're doing something I can't do.
We can't admire people who can do what we can do. I don't admire anyone who can drive fast while shouting, but when I watch a dry-stone-waller creating a natural barrier using nothing but experience and big, warty hands, I become a statue of wonderment held upright by nothing but the tingling in my hair. That's what happens when I hear a drum solo.
A columnist last week said that words cannot begin to describe the "unstoppable misery" of the "nightmarish" drum solo. Plainly, he is the sort of man who thinks drummers are like houseflies. That they come, they make an annoying noise and then they die. And I literally could not agree less.
A drum solo allows the audience to marvel at the technical wizardry of the drummer. It allows us to concentrate on his incredible ability to get a whole arm from one side of the kit to the other faster than it takes a Formula One car to change gear. And to do it in perfect time.
It's been suggested that Ginger Baker invented the drum solo so his bandmates could have a moment to go backstage and top up whatever was missing at that moment from their lives. I doubt this, though. He didn't really like other musicians that much.
It's been reported that he called Mick Jagger a "musical moron". But that's not true. What he actually said was that the Stones were like "a load of little kids trying to play black blues music and playing it very badly". It was George Harrison he called a musical moron. And he dismissed Paul McCartney too, because, unlike him, McCartney could not sight-read music. Led Zeppelin? If you even mentioned them in his presence, you'd get a thick lip. He only really liked people we've never heard of. Phil Seamen was a hero of his, for example. And Art Blakey.
So no. Baker was on the stage doing his solos simply so we could hear how he'd fused the jazz music of his heroes with an altogether new and busy way of playing. He despised the 4/4 beat of rock and pop music, but it's possible that, because of what he did with Cream, he's partly responsible for it.
His solos were often more than 10 minutes long and were mesmerising. And soon drummers everywhere were trying to outdo him. Led Zeppelin's John Bonham did a 17-minute epic on the track "Moby Dick", and then you got — whisper this, because I'm friendly with Nick Mason and Roger Taylor — my favourite drummer, Phil Collins, duetting with Chester Thompson. They started out hitting bar stools and then moved to their kits for a drumming shootout. It's the best thing on YouTube.
And now? Well, there was the movie Whiplash, which everyone, apart from me, thought was weird — but on stage? In real life? There's nothing. The drum solo is dead.
I find that odd. There are still bands and some still have drummers, so why don't these people want the audience to see and hear them doing their thing? Isn't that like being a goalkeeper who never wants to make a save? The only explanation is that they actively hide at the back behind the bass and the guitar and the flashy vocals because they're not that good.
This sort of thing has happened before. Between 1750 and 1820, the world heard from Schubert, Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn, but since then, apart from a couple of little spurts, there's been nothing of any great consequence. And today? There's a woman in Iceland who turns drawings of turnips into classical music and there's Ludovico Einaudi, who provided the soundtrack for many of the Top Gear films I made. But that's about it.
Could it be that the same thing has happened with drumming? That we as a species were only ever any good at it between 1958 and 1978, and now we have lost the ability, in the same way that penguins have lost the ability to fly? Luckily, however, we still have the recordings from the days when drumming wasn't just an electronic nn tss nn tss nn tss nn tss and I've been listening to a lot of it all week. That's why I ended up revisiting "Can't Find My Way Home." You played on that one, Ginger. And now you have.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
And here's the Sun column: "Extinction Rebellion forget dole money, tents and yoga mats all come from… oil"
Clarkson is wrong by the way: Ginger Baker is only the world's fourth best drummer. The best and second best are Hal Blaine and Levon Helm.
Anyway, I have now caught up on posting all the Clarkson columns that ran while I was on vacation. Normal weekly posting will resume on Monday.
submitted by _Revelator_ to thegrandtour [link] [comments]

Daniel Craig interview for the Sunday Times: the James Bond actor on No Time To Die, his new comedy Knives Out, Phoebe Waller-Bridge and the problem with social media.

“Well, I’d like to give you a breakdown of my week, but people would just think I was complaining,” he explains, his voice gruff and loud, a man you could understand perfectly in a packed bar. “But every day has an intensity to it. We’re trying to make the best f****** Bond movie we can. Pulling out all the stops. If we aim for the stars, we might hit the treetops.” He pauses, briefly. “The most interesting thing? Yesterday I was up to my neck in water for 12 hours.” ... “This may be hard to believe,” Craig continues, “but I love the fact I’m Bond. We’re in rare air, making Bond movies. It is one of the most intense, fulfilling things I’ve ever done, but it takes a lot of energy and I’m getting old. I’m getting creaky. And so what I do outside of that has got to be really good.” ... I ask if he is happy to talk about the notoriously secret new Bond. “Yeah, yeah,” he replies. First, forget that daft misreading of an interview Craig did in 2015, in which he apparently said he would rather slash his wrists than make another 007 film. What he actually said was: “Now? I’d rather break this glass and slash my wrists. No, not at the moment.” He was always contracted to make No Time to Die, and all he meant was that he wanted a break. Now he has had one, and so, after Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace, Skyfall and Spectre, we get to see him put on the DJ again.
The big news this time is that Phoebe Waller-Bridge has a writing credit. Was it his idea to get her in? “Yeah.” What will she bring to Bond? “You’ll have to wait and see!” he shouts, before laughing. “But she’s just brilliant. I had my eye on her ever since the first Fleabag [TV series], and then I saw Killing Eve and what she did with that and just wanted her voice. It is so unique — we are very privileged to have her on board.”
When I met Craig in 2014, for Spectre, we talked about misogyny in Bond, and the actor said he was pleased that, by casting Monica Bellucci as 007’s similarly aged lover in the film, a dialogue had been started about sexism, wage disparities and similar issues. Waller-Bridge is only the second woman to have a writing credit during the franchise’s 57-year history, after Johanna Harwood on Dr No and From Russia with Love. A cynic might suggest the new recruit has been chosen to help the film look more representative.
“Well, I think Phoebe coming on...” Craig begins. “She has been asked many times about what she is going to do, and her answer is that we’re not really going to change anything. He’s James Bond. But, of course, it’s a different angle to come at ...”
He stops and draws breath.
“Look, we’re having a conversation about Phoebe’s gender here, which is f****** ridiculous. She’s a great writer. Why shouldn’t we get Phoebe onto Bond? That’s the answer to that. I know where you’re going, but I don’t actually want to have that conversation. I know what you’re trying to do, but it’s wrong. It’s absolutely wrong. She’s a f****** great writer. One of the best English writers around. I said, ‘Can we get her on the film?’ That’s where I came from.” ... And, finally, before he heads back to work, what will he miss most about Bond? “I’ll miss my friends,” he says, as quiet as he has been all chat. “I’ve worked with many of these people for 15 years now, and that will be a real jar. I’ll see them again, but this is a special atmosphere, on a Bond set.”
submitted by Pain-Author to JamesBond [link] [comments]

5 years later, I finally finished the novels... here are my thoughts

5 years to the week after I started, I finished all of Fleming's Bond novels (for the record, it didn't take me 5 years to actually read them, I just didn't read them all at once). I had fun reading them, but I wouldn't necessarily recommend them to someone who wasn't an actual Bond fan... other than a handful of them, they're not amazing books in and of themselves. However they're definitely enjoyable if you're into the movies because they help expand the lore. It's also really cool to see what the movies drew from the books, what they didn't, and how the movies even began influencing the novels. Here are some of my thoughts.
*Minor spoilers ahead

The highs:
Live and Let Die - Maybe my favorite. I can't remember the last time I read a book and felt genuine fear of the villain the way I did in LALD. It's also a very personal revenge story, similar to Licence to Kill. It was interesting to see how parts of this book made it into 4 different Bond movies. I also think this one was really well-told and well-paced as a spy thriller. It does have a lot of 60s era racism, so be prepared for that if you read it.
From Russia With Love - Famously JFK's favorite book. It's pretty true to the movie, but I think that the book develops the shady criminal organization a little bit better. Bond doesn't even show up until halfway through, as the entire first part is a setup to the slow burn that ultimately results a spectacular finish. It also provides an interesting window into Soviet espionage operations based on Fleming's own knowledge. As far as spy novels go, this is truly one of the best slow burn espionage Cold War thrillers.
Moonraker - Unexpectedly one of the best. Other than the title and name of the villain, it (fortunately) has nothing in common with the movie. Hugo Drax, instead of being the space nazi that we know from the movie, is an aerospace government contractor with shady WWII origins. A lot of fun to read, but fair warning: there is a LOT of bridge. But the details don't matter... there is enough context to the bridge scenes that you can still understand what's happening without knowing how the game works.
Thunderball - Another one where the movie adaptation was very faithful, but the book was just that much better. There is more detail in the explanation of SPECTRE's organization and leadership structure. The book hits all the same beats as the movie, but with more of Fleming's trademark flair.
If you're a casual fan and aren't planning to read all of the novels, any or all of these four would be ones I'd recommend. I left out Casino Royale because, while it's an excellent book, the movie is a very faithful adaptation so if you have seen the movie, there will be no surprises while reading the book.

The lows:
Dr. No - While Fleming is known for the fantastical elements of his stories, Dr. No begins to border on the absurd. The climax where Bond has to escape an obstacle course and then fight a giant squid is a little much even by Fleming's standards.
The Spy Who Loved Me - Not really a spy story, very low stakes, not much room for character development, and overall doesn't quite vibe with the rest of the series.
007 in New York - The hell did I just read?

A few more random thoughts:
-There are things the movies definitely improved on. One thing some of them do well is leave out some of the more unreal and absurd elements from the books. The movies also vastly improve on the locations. The novels almost entirely take place in Western Europe, the US, and the Caribbean. Another thing is the women. While there are some movie Bond girls who are just dumb and cute damsel-in-distress types, there are just as many who are strong and cool and have their own agenda. The books only contain the former.
-The villains always have great backstories in the books that were frequently thrown away for the movies. Most of them have their origins in WWII, the USSR, or the Cuban revolution. One example is that Le Chiffre in the books was a Holocaust survivor, which makes his origin way more interesting (obviously, you'd have to update this so it makes sense with the times but the movies frequently don't focus on the villain's backstory).
-The books also show the actual tedium of being a spy. Fleming brings up the fact that the job is mostly paperwork with one or two major jobs a year. Of course, Bond doing paperwork wouldn't make for an exciting movie, but it still would be cool if they would at least touch on that.
-Felix is much more interesting in the books, mainly because *spoiler for a book that's over 50 years old* he gets attacked by a shark in book #2 and spends the rest of the novels as a private eye with a peg leg and a hook hand.
-Maybe an unpopular opinion, but I was never able to buy James and Tracy's relationship in the movie OHMSS. The book presents it much better and it doesn't seem nearly as forced, namely because you have more of Bond's inner monologue rationalizing it.
-Ian Fleming LOVES food, clothing, and flowers. These things are described in unnecessarily vivid detail throughout the novels.
-Fleming seems to have cast his own actor to play James Bond. In two separate instances in the first couple of books, people tell Bond he looks like Hoagy Carmichael, an actor who I had to Google to see what he looked like. I think this was his way of telling the audience which actor should be playing Bond when you picture him in your head.
-Usually we talk about how the movies were influenced by the books, but it was cool to see ways that the books were actually influenced by the movies. For example, after Connery started playing the character, Fleming gave Bond a Scottish origin. (EDIT: See comments for correction). Also, Fleming later adapts Bond's catchphrase from the movies when in Octopussy, he tells someone his name is "Bond, James Bond." (It may have occurred earlier, this is just the first instance I noticed).

I'd like to hear your thoughts, if you agree or disagree with anything, or have any thoughts or trivia to add. I usually don't write this much on the internet but this was the best place to share my thoughts so thank you for coming to my TED talk.

tl;dr: The novels are fun. Better in some ways than their respective movies, much improved upon in others. LALD, FRWL, MR, and TB are the ones most worth reading IMO.
submitted by fn2187tk421 to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Debunking the code name theory

Ian Fleming gave the James Bond character a backstory, and didn't consider James Bond to be a code name, but rather the man's birth name. The movies followed the idea of Bond being a single individual, and the original series from Connery to Brosnan became a loose continuity with Bond as an ageless character in order to keep the movies contemporary. Part of the agelessness of Bond was the actor changes.
The original continuity from Dr. No to Die Another Day demonstrates on several occasions that James Bond is the same man throughout:
In addition to all this, it has been pointed out that each version of Bond has broadly the same personality traits, and the recurring cast - M, Q, Moneypenny, Felix Leiter - all treat Bond the same. Are we expected to believe that everybody who gets the code name is meant to have the same personality, tastes, and interacts with the same people the same way?
The reboot continuity - the Craig era - is a totally different continuity to the original, but it is very clear that James Bond is Bond's actual name:
Conclusion: James Bond is the birth name of one man, and his different appearances are simply the result of Eon Productions using a floating timeline and making the character ageless in order to keep the movies contemporary.
submitted by Vanquisher1000 to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Missed opportunity: Christian Bale as James Bond would have been better than his Batman.

I tend to see Nolan's Batman trilogy as being primarily a product of Christopher Nolan's vision/execution, seasoned with some top shelf acting by Gary Oldman, Heath Ledger, Michael Caine, Tom Hardy (the best of the least film) Aaron Eckhart and Morgan Freeman (among many others).
But Christian Bale's Bruce Wayne, and especially his Batman, are, when you take away the surface trappings and the neat toys, far from the strongest performances in any of the films.
Off the top of my head I think you could have plugged, for example, Keanu Reeves into the role, and under Nolan's direction he would have been just as good or probably a lot better, just by being more interesting. Plus he had the cred already from the Matrix films if nothing else, and he looked good in a fight.
But I remember seeing American Psycho the weekend it opened, and thinking that Christian Bale would be the most perfect guy to play 007 at some point.
He had the looks, the ability with dark humor, and the killer skills required for a guy with a License to Kill. I also think he would have been more than capable of handling the more realistic direction the producers choose to give the rebooted Bond in Casino Royale.
I know people like to point to Daniel Craig's unusual looks as being key to his more 'thug' like origin story (and honestly he's made a great James Bond) but Bale could have taken that killer stuff into a much darker area while fitting in better visually with the legacy of the actors that have played the character.
Bottom line I just think the role of James Bond would have suited Bale's skill sets a lot better than Batman did, and as wonderful as Nolan's Batman films are (mostly) I think they could have been even better had someone else been cast in the lead role.
P.S.: Yeah I know we can't change history (only Tarantino can do that) but it's Friday and I'm just trying to start a bit of "What if" movie discussion about two of my favorite franchise characters.
Thanks for reading. Please don't hurt me.
submitted by MattelJones to movies [link] [comments]

Trump, Murdoch, Lauder, Giuliani, and Russia: The Tangled Web

Roy Cohn: US Political Nexus
In the 1980‘s Ron Lauder (1), Rupert Murdoch (2), and Donald Trump (3) shared the same mob-connected lawyer, Roy Cohn. As a matter of fact Roy Cohn even introduced Roger Stone to Trump in 1979 (3).
Stone appeared on East 68th Street to find Cohn, just awakened, in his robe, sitting with one of his clients, Mob boss “Fat Tony” Salerno, of the Genovese crime family. “In front of [Roy] was a slab of cream cheese and three burnt slices of bacon,” Stone remembered. “He ate the cream cheese with his pointing finger. He listened to my pitch and said, ‘You need to see Donald Trump. I will get you in, but then you are on your own.’ ”
Shortly after, Stone founded Black Manafort & Stone with Paul Manafort and Charlie Black and took on Donald Trump as their first client (3). Stone later introduced Trump to Manafort in 1988 at the Republican National Committee (4).
  1. http://www.maryellenmark.com/text/magazines/vanity%20fai925E-000-007.html
  2. https://consortiumnews.com/2016/06/19/how-roy-cohn-helped-rupert-murdoch-2/
  3. https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/06/donald-trump-roy-cohn-relationship
  4. https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2017/10/a-timeline-of-paul-manaforts-relationship-with-the-trump-world.html
Enter Russia
In 1986, Russia’s ambassador to the US, Yuri Dubinin, and Donald Trump dined at a luncheon hosted by the Lauders. The following year Dubinin invited Trump to what would become Trump’s first of many trips to Russia. There Trump toured possible locations for a potential Trump Tower in Moscow (1). By 1989 the Lauders made their own ventures into Russia, opening up their first Estee Lauder boutique in Moscow, just blocks from the Red Square (2).
That same year Ron Lauder joined forces with Arthur Finkelstein and Roger Ailes to run for New York mayor against Rudy Giuliani. When Lauder lost the primary to Giuliani, Ailes jumped shipped and joined Giuliani’s team. Ultimately, however, Giuliani lost the election (3), though he'd go on to attain the mayorship in 1993.
  1. https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/11/19/trump-first-moscow-trip-215842
  2. http://articles.latimes.com/1989-11-16/news/mn-2346_1_estee-lauder-shop
  3. https://www.nytimes.com/1989/04/02/nyregion/president-s-brother-is-promoting-a-giuliani-lauder-alliance.html
The Fall of Boris Berezovsky and Rise of Roman Abramovich
Mob-connected Boris Berezovsky benefitted handsomely from the Soviet Union’s march away from communism, becoming one of Russia’s first billionaires through his car dealership company, Logovaz, founded in 1989 (1). In 1995 the Russian presidency, helmed by Boris Yeltsin, was at risk of falling back into the hands of the Communists, so Yeltsin sought assistance from those who benefited most from his policies.
[Yelstin] was desperately in need of funds, and turned to men such as [Roman] Abramovich and Berezovsky, whom he invited to participate in the so-called "loans for shares" scheme in return for financial backing. (2)
For Berezovsky and his protege, Abramovich, that was with Sibneft, which they acquired in 1995. In exchanged for being brought into the loans for shares program, Abramovich was forced to pay Berezovsky $1 billion across 6 years for “kryshna”, or mafia protection (3).
In January 1996, during the Davos World Economic Forum, Berezovsky returned the favor and formed the Davos Pact with other newly minted Russia oligarchs, including Mikhail Fridman and Petr Aven of Alfabank, to bankroll Yeltsin's campaign (4). In the end, though legally capped at $3 million, estimates range that Yeltsin’s campaign spent between $100-$500 million (5). They also brought in many America politicos to assist as well, including George Gorton, Richard Dresner, Joe Shumate (6), and Roger Stone-protege Michael Caputo (7).
Soon after Yeltsin’s victory, Ron Lauder traveled to Moscow to celebrate the opening of another boutique on Red Square. A lavish party was thrown in Lauder’s honor, even attended by Yeltsin himself. And the oligarch who threw the party - Boris Berezovsky (1). At some point Berezovsky would also team up with Rupert Murdoch to form Logovaz News Corporation that invested in Russia media, including Nashe Radio (8).
During Putin’s ascension toward power he found critics in a number of oligarchs that previously supported Yeltsin, including Berezovsky, who criticized Putin’s lean toward authoritarianism. In 2000 Putin succeeded Yeltsin and by the end of the year Berezovsky sought political asylum in London. In 2013 he died a mysterious death (4). Abramovich, however, stayed loyal to Putin and on February 17, 2000 made a deal with Russian oligarch and head of RusAl, Oleg Deripaska, to end the aluminum wars and turn Abramovich from merely rich to a full blown oligarch himself (9).
  1. https://www.forbes.com/free_forbes/1996/1230/5815090a.html
  2. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/may/08/russia.football
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Abramovich#Acquisition_of_Sibneft,_aluminium_wars,_and_loans-for-shares
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Berezovsky_(businessman)
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Yeltsin_presidential_campaign,_1996
  6. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2003/sep/07/film.russia
  7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Caputo
  8. https://www.news24.com/xArchive/Archive/Magnate-tycoon-own-airwaves-20010705
  9. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2003/jul/06/russia.football
Ron Lauder
In 1995 Ron Lauder pushed Bibi Netanyahu to hire past political operative Arthur Finkelstein for Netanyahu’s first run for Prime Minister of Israel (1). Finkelstein also did work for the Trump Organization (2) and, according to Glenn Simpson’s congressional testimony, worked with Roger Stone and Paul Manafort in Ukraine (3).
...Finkelstein worked with Stone and Manafort in Ukraine in or around 2005, 2006, for the same cast of bad guys.
Finkelstein's longtime business associate and adviser to Netanyahu, George Birnbaum, would later reach out to Paul Manafort's deputy, Rick Gates, when Gates joined Trump's campaign, and presented a plan for a campaign of social media manipulation run by Israeli intelligence officers through Psy-Group, owned by Joel Zamel (25). Later Erik Prince would arrange for Joel Zamel to meet with George Nader and Don Jr. to discuss Zamel's proposal. Nader ultimately paid $2 million dollars for the work (26).
Ron Lauder and Netanyahu would become close and in 1998, Lauder, Netanyahu, and George Nader joined forces in ultimately failed negotiations between Israel and Syria (4). In the 2000's, after spending a year a Prague prison for pedophilia, Nader moved to the UAE and quickly rebuilt his political connections, becoming trusted emissary to the crown princes of both Saudi Arabia (MBS) and the UAE (MBZ). Soon after, Erik Prince of Blackwater hired Nader as a "business development consultant" from March 2004 - Nov 2008 (33) to acquire security contracts with Iraq (30). In 2010, as Blackwater struggled under scandal, Prince moved to the UAE himself and founded another private security firm, r2, directly financed my MBZ. R2 was tasked with securing a number of Middle East power plants yet to be built (31).
In Dec 2016 after a secret meeting with MBZ at Trump Tower that included Steve Bannon, Jared Kushner, and Michael Flynn (which was at the center of the unmasking controversy), Prince discussed with Nader and MBZ a back-channel to Russia. At the time Nader was promoting a plan to destabilize Iran using private security contractors (26). A month later Nader and MBZ introduced Prince to the head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund in Seychelles (32), a meeting currently under investigation by the FBI special counsel. Nader is cooperating with Mueller.
In 2000, Allen Roth, Lauder’s longtime aide who helped in his 1989 mayoral run, founded One Jerusalem and later its offshoot, Secure America Now. Ron Lauder and Robert Mercer are top donors to Secure America Now and Devon Gaffney Cross, on the board of One Jerusalem (6), is sister to Michael Flynn associate Frank Gaffney of the Center for Security Policy (7). One Jerusalem is currently under investigation for a corruption scheme involving a Netanyahu aide (5).
In an email to George Nader, Elliott Broidy claims Secure America Now was one of the companies he worked with (8). In 2003, Elliott Broidy bribed the New York State pension into investing in a private equity firm he founded to invest in Israel (9). In 2005 Broidy started a private security contractor business, Circinus, that recently acquired a $200 million contract with the UAE (28), arranged by George Nader a(29). Broidy is currently the subject of a criminal probe in Ukraine for working with a US sanctioned Russian bank, VTB, in 2014 (27).
In 1997 Ron Lauder teamed up with a Vadim Rabinovich on a media venture into Ukraine (10).
American Government officials acknowledged that embassy officials had told Mr. Lauder and other company officials about Mr. Rabinovich's conviction and his links to Grigory Loutchansky, a Russian whose company, Nordex, is suspected of having ties to criminal organizations.
In 2003 the Lauder Institute teamed up with Russia Oligarch Michael Fridman and German Khan’s Alfabank to form the “Excellence in Foreign Investement in Russia” award, with Leonard Lauder and Richard Burt on the board (11). Richard Burt, working for Diligence, had previously worked as a lobbyist for Oleg Deripaska, Deripaska’s RusAl, and Gazprom, and was once implicated in a scam to steal information from an Alfabank competitor (12)(13). Diligence also happens to be owned by Deripaska's London-based business partner, Nathanial Rothschild (23). Burt, along with Paul Manfort and George Papadopoulos, edited Trump’s first speech on foreign policy, where Trump promised Russia a great deal (14).
In 2004 Ron Lauder sold shares of Channel-9 and Channel-10 to Russian Oligarch Lev Leviev, a close associate of Roman Abramovich (19). Lev Leviev would later do business with Jared Kushner (22). In 2013 Lauder negotiated selling a major stake in Channel-10 to Len Blavatnik (18), a Russia oligarch currently under investigation by Mueller (20). And here is Lauder hanging out with Roman Abramovich in 2018 (21).
In November 2014 Ron Lauder met with Alfa-bank founders Mikhail Fridman and German Khan in London (15). German Khan’s son-in-law pled guilty for lying to Mueller about his work with Paul Manafort.
On March 31st, Papdopoulos told Trump he can “arrange a meeting between Trump and Putin” (16). On April 19 2016, Ron Lauder personally met with Putin (17).
More recently, in October 2018 Trump dispatched Ron Lauder to met with the president of Palenstine behind Jared Kushner's back to reinstate peace talks (24).
Lauder had proposed running a back channel between the PA leader and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, but the initiative ultimately fizzled.
  1. https://www.thejc.com/news/israel/arthur-finkelstein-little-known-strategist-who-changed-the-course-of-israel-s-history-dies-aged-72-1.443165
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_J._Finkelstein
  3. https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:House-Intel-Glenn-Simpson-Transcript.pdf/113
  4. https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/.premium-trump-russia-mueller-probe-the-israel-connections-1.6116639
  5. https://www.timesofisrael.com/ex-netanyahu-aide-received-money-from-group-tied-to-billionaire-lauder-report/
  6. http://powerbase.info/index.php/Devon_Cross
  7. https://www.newsweek.com/ezra-cohen-watnick-donald-trump-devin-nunes-russia-barack-obama-wiretap-susan-583904
  8. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/21/us/politics/george-nader-elliott-broidy-uae-saudi-arabia-white-house-influence.html
  9. https://www.haaretz.com/1.5040615
  10. https://www.nytimes.com/1997/04/05/world/a-cosmetics-heir-s-joint-venture-is-tainted-by-ukrainian-s-past.html
  11. https://web.archive.org/web/20060927104324/https://alfabank.com/media/news/2006/06/20/
  12. https://www.thenation.com/article/mccains-kremlin-ties/
  13. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/29/haley-barbour-iran-nuclear-program-bgr_n_1375102.html
  14. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/28/us/politics/transcript-trump-foreign-policy.html
  15. https://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/russian-philanthropists-bound-for-london-1.61095
  16. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/oct/30/george-papadopoulos-timeline-trump-campaign-adviser-russia-links
  17. https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/top-jewish-leader-lauder-thanks-putin-for-fighting-anti-semitism-1.5436695
  18. https://www.haaretz.com/.premium-jewish-billionaire-len-blavatnik-may-buy-control-of-ch-10-1.5289898
  19. https://www.haaretz.com/1.4746237
  20. https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/exclusive-special-counsel-probing-donations-foreign-connections-trump/story?id=55054482
  21. http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/241425
  22. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jul/24/jared-kushner-new-york-russia-money-laundering
  23. https://www.thenation.com/article/mccains-kremlin-ties/
  24. https://www.timesofisrael.com/lauder-said-to-meet-abbas-on-trumps-behalf-in-bid-to-jump-start-peace-talks/
  25. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/08/us/politics/rick-gates-psy-group-trump.html
  26. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/19/us/politics/trump-jr-saudi-uae-nader-prince-zamel.html
  27. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/03/trump-donor-ukraine-criminal-probe-180307124432781.html
  28. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/04/elliott-broidy-history-bribery-pro-israel-advocacy-180404120351079.html
  29. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/21/us/politics/george-nader-elliott-broidy-uae-saudi-arabia-white-house-influence.html
  30. https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-trump-saudi-uae-princes-20180521-story.html
  31. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/15/world/middleeast/15prince.html
  32. https://www.cnn.com/2017/09/13/politics/susan-rice-house-investigators-unmasked-trump-officials/index.html
  33. https://littlesis.org/relationships/1457568
Rupert Murdoch and wife Wendi Deng
In the 90‘s Murdoch ventured into Russia media with mob-linked Boris Berezovsky of Logovaz. The two formed a joint venture, Logovaz News Corp, that invested in a number of Russian media properties, including Nashe Radio (1). Then in 2002 Murdoch entered into the Russian billboard industry (2):
By all accounts, the unexpected break for Murdoch in the Russian ad market came in 2002 after the assassination of Vladimir Kanevsky, then the billboard king of Moscow. In February of that year, at an intersection near the Kremlin, a man in a black ski cap walked up to Kanevsky's car and pumped five rounds into his head and chest.
Murdoch's Russia ventures have been investigated for bribery. This was all in the background when, in 1999, Rupert Murdoch married Wendi Deng whom he and the FBI suspect of being a spy (3).
Since their divorce, Murdoch has been telling anybody who would listen that Wendi is a Chinese spy--and had been throughout the marriage.
In 2006, when Jared Kushner bought the Observer, Murdoch became his close mentor (4).
When Jared Kushner took over the New York Observer in mid-2006 (around the time he met Ivanka Trump, whom he would marry in 2009) he turned to Murdoch for counsel.
Jared and Ivanka were known to double-date with Murdoch and his ex-wife Wendi Deng, and even after Murdoch’s split with Deng, the two women and the two men remained close.
Kushner then directed the Observer erase such stories, and more (4).
The erasures first occurred under the leadership of then-editor-in-chief Elizabeth Spiers, who told The Post she was unaware of the erasure but said Kushner previously requested over the phone she couch stories about media mogul Rupert Murdoch, his mentor.
In 2007 Wendi Deng, introduced Ivanka Trump to the wife of Roman Abramovich, Dasha Zhukova (5). In 2010, Jared Kushner's brother, Joshua, invested in a joint venture founded by Zhukova and Deng, Arsty.net (6). Then in 2014 Zhukova invited Deng, Ivanka, and Kushner to Moscow where they partied with Abramovich, Viktor Vekselberg, Len Blavatnik, and Alfa-bank execs, including the son-in-law of Sergei Lavrov (7).
A week before inauguartion Ivanka Trump hosted a secret dinner at the home of Wendi Deng where she collected advice from a series of powerful business women (8). The two then hung out during Trump's inauguaration (9).
In 2010, Israel granted oil rights in Syria to Rupert Murdoch and Lord Jacob Rothschild, both of Genie Energy (10). Jacob also sits on the international advisory board to Blackstone Group (13), who's founder, Steve Schwarzman, sat on the board of the Russian Direct Investment Fund (14). Jacob's brother, Nathaniel, is also business partners with Oleg Deripaska, and owns Diligence, which employed Richard Burt to lobby on behalf of Deripska, RusAl, and Gazprom (11).
Richard Burt was John McCains top policy adviser in 2000 and an adviser to McCain during McCain's 2008 run for the presidency. Nathanial, Burt's employer, ended up hosting a dinner for John McCain that gained much criticism at the time (11):
...one conservative watchdog group in the US went after McCain half a year ago for facilitating a fundraiser at the home of Nat Rothschild, the Deripaska associate at the center of the Osborne-Mandelson row. Foreign donations, even "in-kind" contributions such as assistance raising money, are prohibited under American election law.
In 2018 Ron Lauder awarded the entire Rothschild family the Herzl Award (12).
  1. https://www.news24.com/xArchive/Archive/Magnate-tycoon-own-airwaves-20010705
  2. http://content.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2085878,00.html
  3. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/01/16/fbi-warned-jared-kushner-wendi-deng-could-use-friendship-push/
  4. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jun/16/donald-trump-rupert-murdoch-friendship-fox-news
  5. https://www.townandcountrymag.com/society/money-and-powea12106454/who-is-dasha-zhukova/
  6. https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/arts-and-culture/a18929591/wendi-murdoch-interview-artsy/
  7. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-18/billionaire-ally-of-putin-socialized-with-kushner-ivanka-trump
  8. http://fortune.com/2017/01/13/ivanka-trump-dinner-murdoch/
  9. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4139016/Ivanka-poses-Wendi-Deng-night-inauguration.html
  10. https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2013/02/israel-grants-oil-rights-in-syria-to-murdoch-and-rothschild/
  11. https://www.thenation.com/article/mccains-kremlin-ties/
  12. http://thejewishvoice.com/2018/10/10/ron-lauder-present-theodor-herzl-award-rothschild-family-nyc/
  13. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Rothschild,_4th_Baron_Rothschild
  14. https://www.businessinsider.com/russian-investment-fund-connected-to-us-investors-sanctioned-2015-7
Rudy Giuliani
From 1977-1981 Giuliani worked at law firm Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler. One of the partners was Richard Nixon's son-in-law, Ed Cox (22). Ed Cox would later introduce Carter Page to the Trump campaign in Dec 2015 (23).
In 1993 Rudy Giuliani attained the mayorship of New York with the help of Sam Kislin, a major donor with links to the Russian mafia, whom Giuliani later appointed to the New York City Mayor's Council of Economic Advisors (18)(19)(21). Sam Kislin ran an electronics store with Tamir Sapir. Tamir Sapir's Sapir Organization later teamed up with the Trump Organization and Felix Sater's Bayrock Group for Trump SoHo in 2006 (20).
During Giuliani's 1993 campaign, he developed a close bond with Bernard Kerik, a police detective for the NYPD who once helped arrange security for the Saudi royal family and assisted Giuliani through his campaign. When airplanes struck the World Tower in 2001, it was Kerik standing by Giuliani’s side (1).
During the 90‘s, however, Kerik developed mob-ties, details which spilled out in 2004 nomination process to become head of Homeland Security. One of those ties, whom the mob hired on Kerik’s request, was Lawrence Ray (2). In 2009 Kerik pled guilty to corruption, tax evasion, and making false statements.
In 1996 Ray was indicted for a pump-and-dump stock scheme run by several New York crime families, including the Gambinos, and the Russian mob, including none other than Felix Sater (3) who later arranged for Ivanka Trump to sit in Putin’s chair in Moscow and worked with the Trump Organization on the fraud-laden Trump SoHo project (5).
Interstate Industrial was also tied to former Gambino captain, Dominic Borghese (13). Another member of the Gambino crime family, Julius Nasso, ran his own mob-linked concrete company that worked jointly with S&A on Trump Tower . S&A was part owned by Roy Cohn's other client, "Fat Tony" of the Genovese crime family (12).
Julius Nasso's nephew of the same name partnered with Paul Manaofort to found Manhattan Pictures and produced Steven Seagal film. Ultimately Nasso spent a year in prison for extorting Steven Seagal (14) business partner in Manhattan Pictures, but not before the two made shadowy dealings with a company that sold Russian nuclear tech to US companies (15).
Also in 1996, just months after Yeltsin’s victory, Rupert Murdoch debuted Fox News Channel and appointed Roger Ailes founding CEO. Immediately Fox News Channel enlisted New York mayor Rudy Giuliani to pressure Time Warner to transmit Fox News (6). Giuliani also developed a close relationship with Donald Trump during his mayorship, including appearing with Trump in a comedy video in 2000 (7) and borrowing Trump’s private plane for a trip to Israel in 2001 (8).
In August 2001 Kerik traveled to Israel and for the first time met Israeli billionaire Eitan Wertheimer, who ran a company that did business with US defense contractors (16). The following December Giuliani borrowed Trump's plane to visit Israel himself (17). In 2002 Giuliani founded Giuliani Partners with Bernard Kerik and in 2003, while Kerik traveled to Iraq as part of the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq, he met up with Wertheimer again and received a "loan" a failed to document it (16).
In 2004 Giuliani Partners obtained Triglobal as a client. Triglobal, a company that connects Western businesses to the former Soviet Union, quickly shuttled Giuliani to Moscow to meet with Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, amongst other prominent politicians and business men of Russia (9).
In February 2013 Giulani met with Emin Agalarov, who’s publicist arranged the Trump Tower meeting with Russian agent Natalia Veselnitskaya (10). Over the years Giulani’s clients have included Alfabank, Rosneft, and Ukrainian politician Vitali Klitschko, all connected to Triglobal (11).
  1. http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/08/30/giuliani.transcript/
  2. https://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/03/us/politics/03kerik.html
  3. https://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/nation-world/national/article174493821.html
  4. https://www.businessinsider.com/ivanka-trump-putin-chair-felix-sater-russia-2017-8
  5. https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/how-ivanka-trump-and-donald-trump-jr-avoided-a-criminal-indictment
  6. https://www.nytimes.com/1996/10/04/nyregion/giuliani-pressures-time-warner-to-transmit-a-fox-channel.html
  7. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/rudy-guiliani-donald-trump-drag-video-seduce-new-york-mayor-us-president-a8344921.html
  8. https://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/11/nyregion/giuliani-used-trump-s-plane-for-weekend-visit-to-israel.html
  9. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/16/us/politics/donald-trump-cabinet-rudy-giuliani.html
  10. https://thesternfacts.com/rudy-giuliani-knows-russian-oligarchs-son-who-linked-trump-campaign-with-spies-3a1a366a90fd
  11. https://thesternfacts.com/the-trump-russia-dossier-includes-rudy-giulianis-clients-alfa-bank-rosneft-and-qatar-1353876e789e
  12. https://www.nytimes.com/1987/01/16/nyregion/convicted-crime-chief-charged-in-bid-rigging.html
  13. https://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/20/nyregion/mob-ties-may-be-innocent-casino-panel-member-says.html
  14. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_R._Nasso
  15. https://www.politico.com/states/florida/story/2017/11/28/florida-lawmakers-former-company-used-manafort-to-pitch-russian-developed-technology-to-us-government-123127
  16. https://talkingpointsmemo.com/muckrakeimg-src-http-talkingpointsmemo-com-images-bush-kerik-lawn-muck-jpg-vspace-5-hspace-5-align-left-billionaire-businessman-gave-kerik-250k-loan
  17. https://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/11/nyregion/giuliani-used-trump-s-plane-for-weekend-visit-to-israel.html
  18. https://nypost.com/1999/12/22/rudy-donor-linked-to-russian-mob/
  19. https://www.newsweek.com/giuliani-mysterious-ties-russia-former-soviet-union-decades-1215349
  20. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-03-16/behind-trump-s-russia-romance-there-s-a-tower-full-of-oligarchs
  21. https://web.archive.org/web/20180423085033/http://old.themoscowtimes.com/sitemap/free/1999/12/article/giuliani-donor-linked-to-russian-mob/268520.html
  22. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patterson_Belknap_Webb_%26_Tyler
  23. https://www.timesunion.com/7day-state/article/N-Y-GOP-s-Cox-introduced-Carter-Page-to-Trump-12553410.php
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